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dc.contributor.advisorBonito, Joseph A.en
dc.contributor.authorErvin, Jennifer
dc.creatorErvin, Jenniferen
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-07T16:50:26Z
dc.date.available2016-10-07T16:50:26Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/620866
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation provides support for the expansion of traditional definitions of information, to include experiential forms of data (e.g., attitudes, opinions, and familiarity related to the task at hand) that have typically been treated as nonsubstantive and therefore were often been excluded from most of the previous research on group information sharing. This study also examines how to effectively intervene when groups develop norms that privilege or suppress then mentioning of certain types of information during decision-making discussions. In an experimental design, groups worked on a series of three fact similar not guilty by reason of insanity (NGRI) cases. Findings indicate that the timing of the introduction of an intervention influences its effect, and that patterns of normative information use over time are different for traditional versus more experiential types of data.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectInformation sharingen
dc.subjectInterventionen
dc.subjectNormsen
dc.subjectCommunicationen
dc.subjectDecision Makingen
dc.titleGroup Norm Development over a Series of Tasks: Supplementing Task Information with Personal Experienceen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberBonito, Joseph A.en
dc.contributor.committeememberHarwood, Jakeen
dc.contributor.committeememberSegrin, Chrisen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T15:02:45Z
html.description.abstractThis dissertation provides support for the expansion of traditional definitions of information, to include experiential forms of data (e.g., attitudes, opinions, and familiarity related to the task at hand) that have typically been treated as nonsubstantive and therefore were often been excluded from most of the previous research on group information sharing. This study also examines how to effectively intervene when groups develop norms that privilege or suppress then mentioning of certain types of information during decision-making discussions. In an experimental design, groups worked on a series of three fact similar not guilty by reason of insanity (NGRI) cases. Findings indicate that the timing of the introduction of an intervention influences its effect, and that patterns of normative information use over time are different for traditional versus more experiential types of data.


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