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dc.contributor.advisorAubrey, Jennifer Stevensen
dc.contributor.authorGamble, Hilary
dc.creatorGamble, Hilaryen
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-14T23:10:40Z
dc.date.available2016-10-14T23:10:40Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621020
dc.description.abstractPrevious authors have suggested that reducing rape and sexual assault will require dismantling the rape culture that exists in the U.S. that supports and condones sexual violence against women (e.g., Brownmiller, 1975; Burt, 1980). Sexual media maintain rape culture by frequently portraying rape myths and sexual stereotypes (e.g., Cuklanz, 1999; Ward, 1995), like traditional heterosexual scripts. These portrayals then increase acceptance of these myths and stereotypes in viewers (e.g., Emmers-Sommer, Pauley, Hanzal,& Triplett, 2006; Kahlor & Eastin, 2011). A two-month longitudinal panel survey was conducted to better understand the theoretical mechanisms that may explain how college students' sexual media use may indirectly influence their propensity for engaging in unwanted hookups through their endorsement of traditional heterosexual scripts, sexual self-efficacy, and perceived peer norms. The results were different for men and women. For women, the results suggested that their sexual media diet at Time 1 increased their endorsement of traditional heterosexual scripts at Time 2, their endorsement of traditional heterosexual scripts at Time 1 increased their propensity for engaging in unwanted hookups at Time 2, and their propensity for engaging in unwanted hookups at Time 1 decreased their sexual self-efficacy at Time 2. For men, the results suggested that their sexual media diet at Time 1 decreased their sexual self-efficacy at Time 2 and their perceived peer norms regarding hookups at Time 1 increased their propensity for engaging in unwanted hookups at Time 2. Together the results suggest sexual media may be negatively impacting college students' sexual attitudes and beliefs and their sexual self-efficacy, which may lead them to be more likely to engage in unwanted hookups. Limitations and future directions are discussed.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectRapeen
dc.subjectScriptsen
dc.subjectSexual mediaen
dc.subjectSexual self-efficacyen
dc.subjectUnwanted sexen
dc.subjectCommunicationen
dc.subjectPeer normsen
dc.titleFrom Sexual Media to Unwanted Hookups: The Mediating Influence of College Students' Endorsement of Traditional Heterosexual Scripts, Sexual Self-Concept, and Perceived Peer Normsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberSegrin, Chrisen
dc.contributor.committeememberWhitaker, Jodieen
dc.contributor.committeememberAubrey, Jennifer Stevensen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-23T11:41:27Z
html.description.abstractPrevious authors have suggested that reducing rape and sexual assault will require dismantling the rape culture that exists in the U.S. that supports and condones sexual violence against women (e.g., Brownmiller, 1975; Burt, 1980). Sexual media maintain rape culture by frequently portraying rape myths and sexual stereotypes (e.g., Cuklanz, 1999; Ward, 1995), like traditional heterosexual scripts. These portrayals then increase acceptance of these myths and stereotypes in viewers (e.g., Emmers-Sommer, Pauley, Hanzal,& Triplett, 2006; Kahlor & Eastin, 2011). A two-month longitudinal panel survey was conducted to better understand the theoretical mechanisms that may explain how college students' sexual media use may indirectly influence their propensity for engaging in unwanted hookups through their endorsement of traditional heterosexual scripts, sexual self-efficacy, and perceived peer norms. The results were different for men and women. For women, the results suggested that their sexual media diet at Time 1 increased their endorsement of traditional heterosexual scripts at Time 2, their endorsement of traditional heterosexual scripts at Time 1 increased their propensity for engaging in unwanted hookups at Time 2, and their propensity for engaging in unwanted hookups at Time 1 decreased their sexual self-efficacy at Time 2. For men, the results suggested that their sexual media diet at Time 1 decreased their sexual self-efficacy at Time 2 and their perceived peer norms regarding hookups at Time 1 increased their propensity for engaging in unwanted hookups at Time 2. Together the results suggest sexual media may be negatively impacting college students' sexual attitudes and beliefs and their sexual self-efficacy, which may lead them to be more likely to engage in unwanted hookups. Limitations and future directions are discussed.


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