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dc.contributor.advisorHarley, Heidien
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Hui-Yu
dc.creatorHuang, Hui-Yuen
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-20T16:22:31Z
dc.date.available2016-10-20T16:22:31Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621101
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation concerns one of the long-term debates about whether an innate grammar, i.e. Universal Grammar, is necessary for a child to acquire a language. The researchers who do not agree that an innate grammar needs to exist argue that the input or the child's experience of language is sufficient to acquire a language. In my work, I examine the relative clause, which is a complex structure cross-linguistically, as a case study to investigate the controversy between the role of innate grammar and the role of input in language acquisition. Based on both the comprehension data of Chinese-speaking children that I collected and the statistical analyses of corpora that I completed, I suggest that a satisfactory theory of language acquisition needs to still incorporate an innate grammar in order to accommodate the various and sometimes inconsistent input properties I document. Nevertheless, the acquisition pattern cannot be explained well without a good understanding of language-specific properties and of their potential interactions with language-external factors such as the comprehension system that may be at work in acquisition.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectInnate Grammaren
dc.subjectInputen
dc.subjectLanguage Acquisitionen
dc.subjectRelative Clausesen
dc.subjectResumptionen
dc.subjectLinguisticsen
dc.subjectChinese Syntaxen
dc.titleThe Role of Innate Grammar and Input in the Acquisition of Chinese Relative Clausesen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberHarley, Heidien
dc.contributor.committeememberKarimi, Siminen
dc.contributor.committeememberFong, Sandiwayen
dc.contributor.committeememberGerken, LouAnnen
dc.contributor.committeememberTroike, Rudolphen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineLinguisticsen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-02T17:50:34Z
html.description.abstractThis dissertation concerns one of the long-term debates about whether an innate grammar, i.e. Universal Grammar, is necessary for a child to acquire a language. The researchers who do not agree that an innate grammar needs to exist argue that the input or the child's experience of language is sufficient to acquire a language. In my work, I examine the relative clause, which is a complex structure cross-linguistically, as a case study to investigate the controversy between the role of innate grammar and the role of input in language acquisition. Based on both the comprehension data of Chinese-speaking children that I collected and the statistical analyses of corpora that I completed, I suggest that a satisfactory theory of language acquisition needs to still incorporate an innate grammar in order to accommodate the various and sometimes inconsistent input properties I document. Nevertheless, the acquisition pattern cannot be explained well without a good understanding of language-specific properties and of their potential interactions with language-external factors such as the comprehension system that may be at work in acquisition.


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