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dc.contributor.advisorHea, Amy Kimmeen
dc.contributor.authorBoggs, Kyle Gregory
dc.creatorBoggs, Kyle Gregoryen
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-21T18:39:24Z
dc.date.available2016-10-21T18:39:24Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621119
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation interrogates the ways in which place-based belongings are constituted through outdoor recreation. By applying material-discursive theories of rhetoric to spaces of outdoor recreation on the Colorado Plateau such as the Arizona Snowbowl ski resort, rock climbing landscapes in the Navajo Nation, adventure mountain biking practices that trace a 19th century stagecoach route, and ultra running trails at Monument Valley on the Navajo Nation and on ancient trails that connect Hopi Villages, and elsewhere, I examine the affective relationships between those activities, landscapes, and cultures. Drawing on spatial and environmental rhetoric and critical theories of race, gender, and sexuality, I analyze affective investments in white settler colonialism to argue that such spaces are more than recreational. The framework I have developed to better explain such spaces, Recreational Colonialism, positions outdoor recreation as the new language of colonialism. Recreational Colonialism is both a discourse and a performance that-in many ways explored in this dissertation-connect outdoor recreational discourses to a trifecta of oppressions through which white settler colonialism depends: white supremacy, capitalism, and heteropatriarchy.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectNew Materialismsen
dc.subjectRecreational Colonialismen
dc.subjectSpaceen
dc.subjectWhite Settler Colonialismen
dc.subjectRhetoricen
dc.subjectRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen
dc.subjectHauntingen
dc.titleToward a Discourse on Recreational Colonialism: Critically Engaging the Haunted Spaces of Outdoor Recreation on the Colorado Plateauen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberHea, Amy Kimmeen
dc.contributor.committeememberLicona, Adela C.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMcAllister, Ken S.en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-26T10:18:47Z
html.description.abstractThis dissertation interrogates the ways in which place-based belongings are constituted through outdoor recreation. By applying material-discursive theories of rhetoric to spaces of outdoor recreation on the Colorado Plateau such as the Arizona Snowbowl ski resort, rock climbing landscapes in the Navajo Nation, adventure mountain biking practices that trace a 19th century stagecoach route, and ultra running trails at Monument Valley on the Navajo Nation and on ancient trails that connect Hopi Villages, and elsewhere, I examine the affective relationships between those activities, landscapes, and cultures. Drawing on spatial and environmental rhetoric and critical theories of race, gender, and sexuality, I analyze affective investments in white settler colonialism to argue that such spaces are more than recreational. The framework I have developed to better explain such spaces, Recreational Colonialism, positions outdoor recreation as the new language of colonialism. Recreational Colonialism is both a discourse and a performance that-in many ways explored in this dissertation-connect outdoor recreational discourses to a trifecta of oppressions through which white settler colonialism depends: white supremacy, capitalism, and heteropatriarchy.


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