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dc.contributor.advisorGantz, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorDenton-Schneider, Jonathan Daniel
dc.creatorDenton-Schneider, Jonathan Danielen
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-24T20:58:36Z
dc.date.available2016-10-24T20:58:36Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621189
dc.description.abstractBrazil's persistent economic volatility highlights the need for Latin American countries to transition from exporting commodities to producing innovative goods and services. Higher- income Brazilian regions like the Southeast have been more successful at this shift than the Northeast, which remains toward the bottom of the World Bank's upper-middle-income range. The goal of my research is to examine how northeastern Brazil can become a more innovative regional economy. One route is to increase high-potential entrepreneurship in cities like Fortaleza, the node linking Brazil to global Internet traffic and the capital of a state that built a 3,000 km fiber optic network to spur innovation. I studied the cases of four high-potential startups to understand the factors that affect their growth and internationalization in the Northeast. To collect my data, I interviewed the founders of each venture as well as consultants and officials who support new firms. In addition to expected barriers like bureaucracy and low foreign language proficiency, I found that the region's oligarchic society impeded the growth of its startups and Brazil's long history of protectionism hindered their internationalization.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectEntrepreneurshipen
dc.subjectOligarchyen
dc.subjectProtectionismen
dc.subjectRegional developmenten
dc.subjectStartupsen
dc.subjectLatin American Studiesen
dc.subjectBrazilen
dc.titleStartups in a Developing Region: The Case of Brazil's Northeasten_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
dc.contributor.committeememberAlsua, Carlos J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberFishback, Price V.en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineLatin American Studiesen
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T15:26:22Z
html.description.abstractBrazil's persistent economic volatility highlights the need for Latin American countries to transition from exporting commodities to producing innovative goods and services. Higher- income Brazilian regions like the Southeast have been more successful at this shift than the Northeast, which remains toward the bottom of the World Bank's upper-middle-income range. The goal of my research is to examine how northeastern Brazil can become a more innovative regional economy. One route is to increase high-potential entrepreneurship in cities like Fortaleza, the node linking Brazil to global Internet traffic and the capital of a state that built a 3,000 km fiber optic network to spur innovation. I studied the cases of four high-potential startups to understand the factors that affect their growth and internationalization in the Northeast. To collect my data, I interviewed the founders of each venture as well as consultants and officials who support new firms. In addition to expected barriers like bureaucracy and low foreign language proficiency, I found that the region's oligarchic society impeded the growth of its startups and Brazil's long history of protectionism hindered their internationalization.


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