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dc.contributor.authorValdovinos, Fernanda Sen
dc.contributor.authorBrosi, Berry Jen
dc.contributor.authorBriggs, Heather Men
dc.contributor.authorMoisset de Espanés, Pabloen
dc.contributor.authorRamos-Jiliberto, Rodrigoen
dc.contributor.authorMartinez, Neo Den
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-31T22:36:04Z
dc.date.available2016-10-31T22:36:04Z
dc.date.issued2016-10
dc.identifier.citationNiche partitioning due to adaptive foraging reverses effects of nestedness and connectance on pollination network stability. 2016, 19 (10):1277-86 Ecol. Lett.en
dc.identifier.issn1461-0248
dc.identifier.pmid27600659
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ele.12664
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621210
dc.description.abstractMuch research debates whether properties of ecological networks such as nestedness and connectance stabilise biological communities while ignoring key behavioural aspects of organisms within these networks. Here, we computationally assess how adaptive foraging (AF) behaviour interacts with network architecture to determine the stability of plant-pollinator networks. We find that AF reverses negative effects of nestedness and positive effects of connectance on the stability of the networks by partitioning the niches among species within guilds. This behaviour enables generalist pollinators to preferentially forage on the most specialised of their plant partners which increases the pollination services to specialist plants and cedes the resources of generalist plants to specialist pollinators. We corroborate these behavioural preferences with intensive field observations of bee foraging. Our results show that incorporating key organismal behaviours with well-known biological mechanisms such as consumer-resource interactions into the analysis of ecological networks may greatly improve our understanding of complex ecosystems.
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Arizona; US NSF [ICER-131383, DEB-1241253, DEB-1120572, OIA-0963529, DBI 0821369, DBI 1219635, DBI 1034780, DBI 0420910, DBI 1262713]; Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory; Emory University; University of California, Santa Cruz; FONDECYT [1150348]; Chilean CONICYT doctoral fellowshipen
dc.languageENG
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWILEY-BLACKWELLen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ele.12664/abstracten
dc.rights© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRSen
dc.subjectAdaptive behaviouren
dc.subjectcommunity stabilityen
dc.subjectconsumer-resource interactionsen
dc.subjectmechanistic modelsen
dc.subjectmutualistic networksen
dc.subjectpopulation dynamicsen
dc.titleNiche partitioning due to adaptive foraging reverses effects of nestedness and connectance on pollination network stability.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Ecol & Evolut Biolen
dc.identifier.journalEcology lettersen
dc.description.noteVersion of Record online: 6 SEP 2016. 12 Month Embargoen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
refterms.dateFOA2017-09-06T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractMuch research debates whether properties of ecological networks such as nestedness and connectance stabilise biological communities while ignoring key behavioural aspects of organisms within these networks. Here, we computationally assess how adaptive foraging (AF) behaviour interacts with network architecture to determine the stability of plant-pollinator networks. We find that AF reverses negative effects of nestedness and positive effects of connectance on the stability of the networks by partitioning the niches among species within guilds. This behaviour enables generalist pollinators to preferentially forage on the most specialised of their plant partners which increases the pollination services to specialist plants and cedes the resources of generalist plants to specialist pollinators. We corroborate these behavioural preferences with intensive field observations of bee foraging. Our results show that incorporating key organismal behaviours with well-known biological mechanisms such as consumer-resource interactions into the analysis of ecological networks may greatly improve our understanding of complex ecosystems.


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