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dc.contributor.authorBlonder, Benjamin
dc.contributor.authorRoyer, Dana L.
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Kirk R.
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Ian
dc.contributor.authorEnquist, Brian J.
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-03T02:47:30Z
dc.date.available2016-11-03T02:47:30Z
dc.date.issued2014-09-16
dc.identifier.citationPlant Ecological Strategies Shift Across the Cretaceous–Paleogene Boundary 2014, 12 (9):e1001949 PLoS Biologyen
dc.identifier.issn1545-7885
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pbio.1001949
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621250
dc.descriptionUA Open Access Publishing Funden
dc.description.abstractThe Chicxulub bolide impact caused the end-Cretaceous mass extinction of plants, but the associated selectivity and ecological effects are poorly known. Using a unique set of North Dakota leaf fossil assemblages spanning 2.2 Myr across the event, we show among angiosperms a reduction of ecological strategies and selection for fast-growth strategies consistent with a hypothesized recovery from an impact winter. Leaf mass per area (carbon investment) decreased in both mean and variance, while vein density (carbon assimilation rate) increased in mean, consistent with a shift towards ‘‘fast’’ growth strategies. Plant extinction from the bolide impact resulted in a shift in functional trait space that likely had broad consequences for ecosystem functioning.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001949en
dc.rightsThis is an open access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.en
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/
dc.titlePlant Ecological Strategies Shift Across the Cretaceous–Paleogene Boundaryen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalPLoS Biologyen
dc.description.noteOpen access journal.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-26T17:02:13Z
html.description.abstractThe Chicxulub bolide impact caused the end-Cretaceous mass extinction of plants, but the associated selectivity and ecological effects are poorly known. Using a unique set of North Dakota leaf fossil assemblages spanning 2.2 Myr across the event, we show among angiosperms a reduction of ecological strategies and selection for fast-growth strategies consistent with a hypothesized recovery from an impact winter. Leaf mass per area (carbon investment) decreased in both mean and variance, while vein density (carbon assimilation rate) increased in mean, consistent with a shift towards ‘‘fast’’ growth strategies. Plant extinction from the bolide impact resulted in a shift in functional trait space that likely had broad consequences for ecosystem functioning.


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This is an open access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.