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dc.contributor.authorYuan, Nicole
dc.contributor.authorDuran, Bonnie
dc.contributor.authorWalters, Karina
dc.contributor.authorPearson, Cynthia
dc.contributor.authorEvans-Campbell, Tessa
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-03T21:14:49Z
dc.date.available2016-11-03T21:14:49Z
dc.date.issued2014-10-14
dc.identifier.citationAlcohol Misuse and Associations with Childhood Maltreatment and Out-of-Home Placement among Urban Two-Spirit American Indian and Alaska Native People 2014, 11 (10):10461 International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph111010461
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621266
dc.descriptionUA Open Access Publishing Funden
dc.description.abstractThis study examined associations between alcohol misuse and childhood maltreatment and out-of-home placement among urban lesbian, gay, and bisexual (referred to as two-spirit) American Indian and Alaska Native adults. In a multi-site study, data were obtained from 294 individuals who consumed alcohol during the past year. The results indicated that 72.3% of men and 62.4% of women engaged in hazardous and harmful alcohol use and 50.8% of men and 48.7% of women met criteria for past-year alcohol dependence. The most common types of childhood maltreatment were physical abuse among male drinkers (62.7%) and emotional abuse (71.8%) among female drinkers. Men and women reported high percentages of out-of-home placement (39% and 47%, respectively). Logistic multiple regressions found that for male drinkers boarding school attendance and foster care placement were significant predictors of past-year alcohol dependence. For female drinkers, being adopted was significantly associated with a decreased risk of past-year drinking binge or spree. Dose-response relationships, using number of childhood exposures as a predictor, were not significant. The results highlight the need for alcohol and violence prevention and intervention strategies among urban two-spirit individuals.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPIen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/11/10/10461/en
dc.rights© 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).en
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectalcohol misuseen
dc.subjectchild maltreatmenten
dc.subjectout-of-home placementen
dc.subjectAmerican Indianen
dc.subjectsexual minorityen
dc.titleAlcohol Misuse and Associations with Childhood Maltreatment and Out-of-Home Placement among Urban Two-Spirit American Indian and Alaska Native Peopleen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
dc.internal.reviewer-noteAmanda - Open Access Publishing Fund article.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-30T19:04:35Z
html.description.abstractThis study examined associations between alcohol misuse and childhood maltreatment and out-of-home placement among urban lesbian, gay, and bisexual (referred to as two-spirit) American Indian and Alaska Native adults. In a multi-site study, data were obtained from 294 individuals who consumed alcohol during the past year. The results indicated that 72.3% of men and 62.4% of women engaged in hazardous and harmful alcohol use and 50.8% of men and 48.7% of women met criteria for past-year alcohol dependence. The most common types of childhood maltreatment were physical abuse among male drinkers (62.7%) and emotional abuse (71.8%) among female drinkers. Men and women reported high percentages of out-of-home placement (39% and 47%, respectively). Logistic multiple regressions found that for male drinkers boarding school attendance and foster care placement were significant predictors of past-year alcohol dependence. For female drinkers, being adopted was significantly associated with a decreased risk of past-year drinking binge or spree. Dose-response relationships, using number of childhood exposures as a predictor, were not significant. The results highlight the need for alcohol and violence prevention and intervention strategies among urban two-spirit individuals.


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© 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).