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dc.contributor.authorMin, Alice A.
dc.contributor.authorSbarra, David A.
dc.contributor.authorKeim, Samuel M.
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-10T05:01:26Z
dc.date.available2016-11-10T05:01:26Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-21
dc.identifier.citationSleep disturbances predict prospective declines in resident physicians’ psychological well-being 2015, 20 (0) Medical Education Onlineen
dc.identifier.issn1087-2981
dc.identifier.doi10.3402/meo.v20.28530
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621337
dc.descriptionUA Open Access Publishing Funden
dc.description.abstractBackground: Medical residency can be a time of increased psychological stress and sleep disturbance. We examine the prospective associations between self-reported sleep quality and resident wellness across a single training year. Methods: Sixty-nine (N69) resident physicians completed the Brief Resident Wellness Profile (M17.66, standard deviation [SD] 3.45, range: 017) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (M6.22, SD 2.86, range: 1225) at multiple occasions in a single training year. We examined the 1-month lagged effect of sleep disturbances on residents’ self-reported wellness. Results: Accounting for residents’ overall level of sleep disturbance across the entire study period, both the concurrent (within-person) within-occasion effect of sleep disturbance (B 0.20, standard error [SE]0.06, p0.003, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.33, 0.07) and the lagged within-person effect of resident sleep disturbance (B 0.15, SE0.07, p0.037, 95% CI: 0.29, 0.009) were significant predictors of decreased resident wellness. Increases in sleep disturbances are a leading indicatorof resident wellness, predicting decreased well-being 1 month later. Conclusions: Sleep quality exerts a significant effect on self-reported resident wellness. Periodic evaluation of sleep quality may alert program leadership and the residents themselves to impending decreases in psychological well-being.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCo-Actionen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.med-ed-online.net/index.php/meo/article/view/28530en
dc.rights© 2015 Alice A. Min et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).en
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectwellnessen
dc.subjectsleep qualityen
dc.subjectresidency trainingen
dc.titleSleep disturbances predict prospective declines in resident physicians’ psychological well-beingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychology, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalMedical Education Onlineen
dc.description.noteOpen access journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T15:38:22Z
html.description.abstractBackground: Medical residency can be a time of increased psychological stress and sleep disturbance. We examine the prospective associations between self-reported sleep quality and resident wellness across a single training year. Methods: Sixty-nine (N69) resident physicians completed the Brief Resident Wellness Profile (M17.66, standard deviation [SD] 3.45, range: 017) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (M6.22, SD 2.86, range: 1225) at multiple occasions in a single training year. We examined the 1-month lagged effect of sleep disturbances on residents’ self-reported wellness. Results: Accounting for residents’ overall level of sleep disturbance across the entire study period, both the concurrent (within-person) within-occasion effect of sleep disturbance (B 0.20, standard error [SE]0.06, p0.003, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.33, 0.07) and the lagged within-person effect of resident sleep disturbance (B 0.15, SE0.07, p0.037, 95% CI: 0.29, 0.009) were significant predictors of decreased resident wellness. Increases in sleep disturbances are a leading indicatorof resident wellness, predicting decreased well-being 1 month later. Conclusions: Sleep quality exerts a significant effect on self-reported resident wellness. Periodic evaluation of sleep quality may alert program leadership and the residents themselves to impending decreases in psychological well-being.


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© 2015 Alice A. Min et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015 Alice A. Min et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).