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dc.contributor.authorHaas, W. Randall
dc.contributor.authorKlink, Cynthia J.
dc.contributor.authorMaggard, Greg J.
dc.contributor.authorAldenderfer, Mark S.
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-10T20:17:18Z
dc.date.available2016-11-10T20:17:18Z
dc.date.issued2015-11-04
dc.identifier.citationSettlement-Size Scaling among Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherer Settlement Systems in the New World 2015, 10 (11):e0140127 PLOS ONEen
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0140127
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621349
dc.descriptionUA Open Access Publishing Fund awarded when author was at University of Arizona.en
dc.description.abstractSettlement size predicts extreme variation in the rates and magnitudes of many social and ecological processes in human societies. Yet, the factors that drive human settlement-size variation remain poorly understood. Size variation among economically integrated settlements tends to be heavy tailed such that the smallest settlements are extremely common and the largest settlements extremely large and rare. The upper tail of this size distribution is often formalized mathematically as a power-law function. Explanations for this scaling structure in human settlement systems tend to emphasize complex socioeconomic processes including agriculture, manufacturing, and warfare—behaviors that tend to differentially nucleate and disperse populations hierarchically among settlements. But, the degree to which heavy-tailed settlement-size variation requires such complex behaviors remains unclear. By examining the settlement patterns of eight prehistoric New World hunter-gatherer settlement systems spanning three distinct environmental contexts, this analysis explores the degree to which heavy-tailed settlement-size scaling depends on the aforementioned socioeconomic complexities. Surprisingly, the analysis finds that power-law models offer plausible and parsimonious statistical descriptions of prehistoric hunter-gatherer settlement-size variation. This finding reveals that incipient forms of hierarchical settlement structure may have preceded socioeconomic complexity in human societies and points to a need for additional research to explicate how mobile foragers came to exhibit settlement patterns that are more commonly associated with hierarchical organization. We propose that hunter-gatherer mobility with preferential attachment to previously occupied locations may account for the observed structure in site-size variation.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPLoSen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0140127en
dc.rights© 2015 Haas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.en
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleSettlement-Size Scaling among Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherer Settlement Systems in the New Worlden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPLOS ONEen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
dc.internal.reviewer-noteAmanda.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T15:38:57Z
html.description.abstractSettlement size predicts extreme variation in the rates and magnitudes of many social and ecological processes in human societies. Yet, the factors that drive human settlement-size variation remain poorly understood. Size variation among economically integrated settlements tends to be heavy tailed such that the smallest settlements are extremely common and the largest settlements extremely large and rare. The upper tail of this size distribution is often formalized mathematically as a power-law function. Explanations for this scaling structure in human settlement systems tend to emphasize complex socioeconomic processes including agriculture, manufacturing, and warfare—behaviors that tend to differentially nucleate and disperse populations hierarchically among settlements. But, the degree to which heavy-tailed settlement-size variation requires such complex behaviors remains unclear. By examining the settlement patterns of eight prehistoric New World hunter-gatherer settlement systems spanning three distinct environmental contexts, this analysis explores the degree to which heavy-tailed settlement-size scaling depends on the aforementioned socioeconomic complexities. Surprisingly, the analysis finds that power-law models offer plausible and parsimonious statistical descriptions of prehistoric hunter-gatherer settlement-size variation. This finding reveals that incipient forms of hierarchical settlement structure may have preceded socioeconomic complexity in human societies and points to a need for additional research to explicate how mobile foragers came to exhibit settlement patterns that are more commonly associated with hierarchical organization. We propose that hunter-gatherer mobility with preferential attachment to previously occupied locations may account for the observed structure in site-size variation.


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© 2015 Haas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015 Haas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.