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dc.contributor.authorZreda, Marek
dc.contributor.authorCosh, Michael H.
dc.contributor.authorOchsner, Tyson E.
dc.contributor.authorMcKee, Lynn
dc.contributor.authorDong, Jingnuo
dc.contributor.authorBasara, Jeffrey B.
dc.contributor.authorEvett, Steven R.
dc.contributor.authorHatch, Christine E.
dc.contributor.authorSmall, Eric E.
dc.contributor.authorSteele-Dunne, Susan C.
dc.contributor.authorSayde, Chadi
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-11T01:39:16Z
dc.date.available2016-11-11T01:39:16Z
dc.date.issued2016-04
dc.identifier.citationCosh, Michael H., Tyson E. Ochsner, Lynn McKee, Jingnuo Dong, Jeffrey B. Basara, Steven R. Evett, Christine E. Hatch et al. "The Soil Moisture Active Passive Marena, Oklahoma, In Situ Sensor Testbed (SMAP-MOISST): Testbed Design and Evaluation of In Situ Sensors." Vadose Zone Journal 15, no. 4 (2016).en
dc.identifier.issn1539-1663
dc.identifier.doi10.2136/vzj2015.09.0122
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621354
dc.description.abstractIn situ soil moisture monitoring networks are critical to the development of soil moisture remote sensing missions as well as agricultural and environmental management, weather forecasting, and many other endeavors. These in situ networks utilize a variety of sensors and installation practices, which confounds the development of a unified reference database for satellite calibration and validation programs. As part of the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission, the Marena, Oklahoma, In Situ Sensor Testbed (SMAP-MOISST) was initiated to perform inter-comparisons and study sensor limitations. Soil moisture sensors that are deployed in major monitoring networks were included in the study, along with new and emerging technologies, such as the Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS), passive/active distributed temperature sensing (DTS), and global positioning system reflectometers (GPSR). Four profile stations were installed in May of 2010, and soil moisture was monitored to a depth of 1 m on an hourly basis. The four stations were distributed within a circular domain of approximately 600 m diameter, adequate to encompass the sensing range of COSMOS. The sensors included in the base station configuration included the Stevens Water Hydra Probe, Campbell Scientific 616 and 229, Decagon EC-TM, Delta-T Theta Probe, Acclima, and Sentek EnviroSMART capacitance system. In addition, the Pico TRIME system and additional time-domain reflectometry (TDR) systems were deployed when available. It was necessary to apply site-specific calibration to most sensors to reach an RMSE below 0.04 m(3) m(-3). For most sensor types, a single near surface sensor could be scaled to represent the areal-average of a field domain by simple linear regression, resulting in RMSE values around 0.03 m(3) m(-3).
dc.description.sponsorshipUSDA Agricultural Research Service; Oklahoma Agricultural Experiment Station; NASA Terrestrial Hydrology Program [NNH10ZDA001N-THP]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSoil Sci Soc Ameren
dc.relation.urlhttps://dl.sciencesocieties.org/publications/vzj/abstracts/15/4/vzj2015.09.0122en
dc.rights© Soil Science Society of America. This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by-ncnd/4.0/).en
dc.titleThe Soil Moisture Active Passive Marena, Oklahoma, In Situ Sensor Testbed (SMAP-MOISST): Testbed Design and Evaluation of In Situ Sensorsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Hydrol & Water Resourcesen
dc.identifier.journalVadose Zone Journalen
dc.description.noteOpen access article.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-19T05:58:13Z
html.description.abstractIn situ soil moisture monitoring networks are critical to the development of soil moisture remote sensing missions as well as agricultural and environmental management, weather forecasting, and many other endeavors. These in situ networks utilize a variety of sensors and installation practices, which confounds the development of a unified reference database for satellite calibration and validation programs. As part of the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission, the Marena, Oklahoma, In Situ Sensor Testbed (SMAP-MOISST) was initiated to perform inter-comparisons and study sensor limitations. Soil moisture sensors that are deployed in major monitoring networks were included in the study, along with new and emerging technologies, such as the Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS), passive/active distributed temperature sensing (DTS), and global positioning system reflectometers (GPSR). Four profile stations were installed in May of 2010, and soil moisture was monitored to a depth of 1 m on an hourly basis. The four stations were distributed within a circular domain of approximately 600 m diameter, adequate to encompass the sensing range of COSMOS. The sensors included in the base station configuration included the Stevens Water Hydra Probe, Campbell Scientific 616 and 229, Decagon EC-TM, Delta-T Theta Probe, Acclima, and Sentek EnviroSMART capacitance system. In addition, the Pico TRIME system and additional time-domain reflectometry (TDR) systems were deployed when available. It was necessary to apply site-specific calibration to most sensors to reach an RMSE below 0.04 m(3) m(-3). For most sensor types, a single near surface sensor could be scaled to represent the areal-average of a field domain by simple linear regression, resulting in RMSE values around 0.03 m(3) m(-3).


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