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dc.contributor.authorMore, Surhud
dc.contributor.authorMiyatake, Hironao
dc.contributor.authorTakada, Masahiro
dc.contributor.authorDiemer, Benedikt
dc.contributor.authorKravtsov, Andrey V.
dc.contributor.authorDalal, Neal K.
dc.contributor.authorMore, Anupreeta
dc.contributor.authorMurata, Ryoma
dc.contributor.authorMandelbaum, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorRozo, Eduardo
dc.contributor.authorRykoff, Eli S.
dc.contributor.authorOguri, Masamune
dc.contributor.authorSpergel, David N.
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-18T20:58:22Z
dc.date.available2016-11-18T20:58:22Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-28
dc.identifier.citationDETECTION OF THE SPLASHBACK RADIUS AND HALO ASSEMBLY BIAS OF MASSIVE GALAXY CLUSTERS 2016, 825 (1):39 The Astrophysical Journalen
dc.identifier.issn1538-4357
dc.identifier.doi10.3847/0004-637X/825/1/39
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621397
dc.description.abstractWe show that the projected number density profiles of Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric galaxies around galaxy clusters display strong evidence for the splashback radius, a sharp halo edge corresponding to the location of the first orbital apocenter of satellite galaxies after their infall. We split the clusters into two subsamples with different mean projected radial distances of their members, < R-mem >, at fixed richness and redshift. The sample with smaller < R-mem > has a smaller ratio of the splashback radius to the traditional halo boundary R-200m than the subsample with larger < R-mem >, indicative of different mass accretion rates for these subsamples. The same subsamples were recently used by Miyatake et al. to show that their large-scale clustering differs despite their similar weak lensing masses, demonstrating strong evidence for halo assembly bias. We expand on this result by presenting a 6.6 sigma difference in the clustering amplitudes of these samples using cluster-photometric galaxy cross-correlations. This measurement is a clear indication that halo clustering depends on parameters other than halo mass. If < R-mem > is related to the mass assembly history of halos, the measurement is a manifestation of the halo assembly bias. However, our measured splashback radii are smaller, while the strength of the assembly bias signal is stronger, than the predictions of collisionless. cold dark matter simulations. We show that dynamical friction, cluster mis-centering, or projection effects are not likely to be the sole source of these discrepancies. However, further investigations regarding unknown catastrophic weak lensing or cluster identification systematics are warranted.
dc.description.sponsorshipAlfred P. Sloan Foundation; National Science Foundation; U.S. Department of Energy; National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Japanese Monbukagakusho; Max Planck Society; Higher Education Funding Council for England; American Museum of Natural History; Astrophysical Institute Potsdam; University of Basel; University of Cambridge; Case Western Reserve University; University of Chicago; Drexel University; Fermilab; Institute for Advanced Study; Japan Participation Group; Johns Hopkins University; Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics; Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; Korean Scientist Group; Chinese Academy of Sciences (LAMOST); Los Alamos National Laboratory; Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy (MPIA); Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics (MPA); New Mexico State University; Ohio State University; University of Pittsburgh; University of Portsmouth; Princeton University; United States Naval Observatory; University of Washington; Spanish MultiDark Consolider Project [CSD2009-00064]; World Premier International Research Center Initiative (WPI Initiative), MEXT, Japan; FIRST program "Subaru Measurements of Images and Redshifts (SuMIRe)", CSTP, Japan; JSPS Promotion of Science [15K17600, 16H01089, 23340061, 26610058, 26800093]; MEXT [15H05893, 15K21733, 15H05892]; JSPS Program for Advancing Strategic International Networks to Accelerate the Circulation of Talented Researchers; Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS); Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology; Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics at the University of Chicago [PHY-1125897]; University of Tokyo-Princeton strategic partnership grant; Department of Energy Early Career Award programen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://stacks.iop.org/0004-637X/825/i=1/a=39?key=crossref.8febbb23119cf4a2ccdd8624897620bcen
dc.rights© 2016. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectdark matteren
dc.subjectcosmology: observationsen
dc.subjectgalaxies: clusters: generalen
dc.subjectlarge-scale structure of universeen
dc.subjectmethods: observationalen
dc.titleDETECTION OF THE SPLASHBACK RADIUS AND HALO ASSEMBLY BIAS OF MASSIVE GALAXY CLUSTERSen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Physen
dc.identifier.journalThe Astrophysical Journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-29T05:12:47Z
html.description.abstractWe show that the projected number density profiles of Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric galaxies around galaxy clusters display strong evidence for the splashback radius, a sharp halo edge corresponding to the location of the first orbital apocenter of satellite galaxies after their infall. We split the clusters into two subsamples with different mean projected radial distances of their members, < R-mem >, at fixed richness and redshift. The sample with smaller < R-mem > has a smaller ratio of the splashback radius to the traditional halo boundary R-200m than the subsample with larger < R-mem >, indicative of different mass accretion rates for these subsamples. The same subsamples were recently used by Miyatake et al. to show that their large-scale clustering differs despite their similar weak lensing masses, demonstrating strong evidence for halo assembly bias. We expand on this result by presenting a 6.6 sigma difference in the clustering amplitudes of these samples using cluster-photometric galaxy cross-correlations. This measurement is a clear indication that halo clustering depends on parameters other than halo mass. If < R-mem > is related to the mass assembly history of halos, the measurement is a manifestation of the halo assembly bias. However, our measured splashback radii are smaller, while the strength of the assembly bias signal is stronger, than the predictions of collisionless. cold dark matter simulations. We show that dynamical friction, cluster mis-centering, or projection effects are not likely to be the sole source of these discrepancies. However, further investigations regarding unknown catastrophic weak lensing or cluster identification systematics are warranted.


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