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dc.contributor.authorFu, Tongcheng*
dc.contributor.authorKo, Jonghan*
dc.contributor.authorWall, Gerard W.*
dc.contributor.authorPinter, Paul J.*
dc.contributor.authorKimball, Bruce A.*
dc.contributor.authorOttman, Michael J.*
dc.contributor.authorKim, Han-Yong*
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-28T16:48:23Z
dc.date.available2016-11-28T16:48:23Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-01
dc.identifier.citationSimulation of climate change impacts on grain sorghum production grown under free air CO2 enrichment 2016, 30 (3) International Agrophysicsen
dc.identifier.issn2300-8725
dc.identifier.doi10.1515/intag-2016-0007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621419
dc.description.abstractPotential impacts of climate change on grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) productivity were investigated using the CERES-sorghum model in the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer v4.5. The model was first calibrated for a sorghum cultivar grown in a free air CO2 enrichment experiment at the University of Arizona, Maricopa, Arizona, USA in 1998. The model was then validated with an independent dataset collected in 1999. The simulated grain yield, growth, and soil water of sorghum for the both years were in statistical agreement with the corresponding measurements, respectively. Neither simulated nor measured yields responded to elevated CO2, but both were sensitive to water supply. The validated model was then applied to simulate possible effects of climate change on sorghum grain yield and water use efficiency in western North America for the years 2080-2100. The projected CO2 fertilizer effect on grain yield was dominated by the adverse effect of projected temperature increases. Therefore, temperature appears to be a dominant driver of the global climate change influencing future sorghum productivity. These results suggest that an increase in water demand for sorghum production should be anticipated in a future high-CO2 world.
dc.description.sponsorshipCooperative Research Program for Agricultural Science and Technology Development, Rural Development Administration, Republic of Korea [PJ010107]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDE GRUYTER OPEN LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.degruyter.com/view/j/intag.2016.30.issue-3/intag-2016-0007/intag-2016-0007.xmlen
dc.rights© 2016 Tongcheng Fu et al., published by De Gruyter Open. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License. (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)en
dc.subjectclimate changeen
dc.subjectcrop simulationen
dc.subjectFACEen
dc.subjectgrain yielden
dc.subjectsorghumen
dc.titleSimulation of climate change impacts on grain sorghum production grown under free air CO2 enrichmenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Plant Scien
dc.identifier.journalInternational Agrophysicsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-02T00:08:33Z
html.description.abstractPotential impacts of climate change on grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) productivity were investigated using the CERES-sorghum model in the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer v4.5. The model was first calibrated for a sorghum cultivar grown in a free air CO2 enrichment experiment at the University of Arizona, Maricopa, Arizona, USA in 1998. The model was then validated with an independent dataset collected in 1999. The simulated grain yield, growth, and soil water of sorghum for the both years were in statistical agreement with the corresponding measurements, respectively. Neither simulated nor measured yields responded to elevated CO2, but both were sensitive to water supply. The validated model was then applied to simulate possible effects of climate change on sorghum grain yield and water use efficiency in western North America for the years 2080-2100. The projected CO2 fertilizer effect on grain yield was dominated by the adverse effect of projected temperature increases. Therefore, temperature appears to be a dominant driver of the global climate change influencing future sorghum productivity. These results suggest that an increase in water demand for sorghum production should be anticipated in a future high-CO2 world.


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