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dc.contributor.advisorBeezley, William H.en
dc.contributor.authorCoronado Guel, Luis Edgardo
dc.creatorCoronado Guel, Luis Edgardoen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-29T19:10:27Z
dc.date.available2016-11-29T19:10:27Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621436
dc.description.abstractAlthough secularization has early antecedents in Mexico's history, the generation who embodied the Constitutionalist faction of the 1910 Revolution undertook an unprecedented campaign to achieve it. Strong anticlerical provisions proclaimed in the 1917 Constitution were implemented and gradually escalated in intensity by the administrations of Presidents Álvaro Obregón and Plutarco Elias Calles. This ignited an armed uprising known as the Cristero Rebellion that arose in rural Mexico in 1926. Beyond the armed conflict, this dissertation analyzes the cultural effects caused by the implementation of such a legal and institutional agenda that reveal a substantial confrontation in the public sphere between two opposed concepts of society-religious and non-religious. As a result, society became highly polarized while the government pushed its secularization aims to the extreme as never before. New laws intervened more intensely on private rights, transforming people's everyday ideas about religion, nation, law, justice and citizenship. By looking at citizens' experiences with such law enforcement, this work elucidates how the state finally neutralized radical Catholicism by stigmatizing it as non-patriotic in the public sphere. This phenomenon that happened between 1917 and 1929 can be conceptualized as the secularization of patriotism and the transformation of people's notions of the legal system- defined as the legal popular culture- that was central to Mexico's social and cultural Revolution.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectCulturalen
dc.subjectIntellectual and Legal Historyen
dc.subjectMexican Revolution & Cristero Rebellionen
dc.subjectModern Mexicoen
dc.subjectPopular Legal Cultureen
dc.subjectFilm and Musicen
dc.subjectSecularizationen
dc.subjectHistoryen
dc.subjectChurch & Stateen
dc.titleDios, Patria y mis Derechos: The Secularization of Patriotism and Popular Legal Culture in Revolutionary Mexico, 1917-1929en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberBeezley, William H.en
dc.contributor.committeememberGosner, Kevinen
dc.contributor.committeememberBarickman, Bert J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberSturman, Janet L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberJenkins, Jenniferen
dc.description.releaseRelease after 31-Aug-2019en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
html.description.abstractAlthough secularization has early antecedents in Mexico's history, the generation who embodied the Constitutionalist faction of the 1910 Revolution undertook an unprecedented campaign to achieve it. Strong anticlerical provisions proclaimed in the 1917 Constitution were implemented and gradually escalated in intensity by the administrations of Presidents Álvaro Obregón and Plutarco Elias Calles. This ignited an armed uprising known as the Cristero Rebellion that arose in rural Mexico in 1926. Beyond the armed conflict, this dissertation analyzes the cultural effects caused by the implementation of such a legal and institutional agenda that reveal a substantial confrontation in the public sphere between two opposed concepts of society-religious and non-religious. As a result, society became highly polarized while the government pushed its secularization aims to the extreme as never before. New laws intervened more intensely on private rights, transforming people's everyday ideas about religion, nation, law, justice and citizenship. By looking at citizens' experiences with such law enforcement, this work elucidates how the state finally neutralized radical Catholicism by stigmatizing it as non-patriotic in the public sphere. This phenomenon that happened between 1917 and 1929 can be conceptualized as the secularization of patriotism and the transformation of people's notions of the legal system- defined as the legal popular culture- that was central to Mexico's social and cultural Revolution.


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