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dc.contributor.advisorGephart, Shelia M.en
dc.contributor.authorKijewski, Amy Lynn
dc.creatorKijewski, Amy Lynnen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-30T20:43:56Z
dc.date.available2016-11-30T20:43:56Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621453
dc.description.abstractPurposes/Aims: The aim of this study was to create a web-based brokerage of patient decision-making aids, titled Split Decision™, and to evaluate student nurse and student nurse practitioners' intent to use and recommend the prototype website based on their perceived usability, usefulness and satisfaction. Rationale/Background: Adult patients frequently report confusion about treatment options, hindering their ability to fully participate in healthcare decision-making. Over 500 patient decision-aids exist on the internet, but are scattered across dozens of websites. Creation of a web-based decision-aid platform would utilize the existing information-seeking habits of patients, but provide them with evidence-based information when evaluating treatment options. Methods: Exemplar decision-aids were chosen from the 563 decision-aids published in the Ottawa Research Institute database and posted on a decision-aid brokerage website. Online access to the website was offered to study participants (n=29) from May to June 2016. Demographic information, quantitative and qualitative responses were collected from each website user and analyzed to evaluate perceived usability, satisfaction, and intention to use the pilot website. Results: Usability of the Split Decision™ website was found to be above average on Systems Usability Scale ratings. Participants rated the website highest on visual appeal and clear terminology on quantitative measures. Qualitative responses cited confusion with the navigation of pages and hyperlinks as areas of future improvement. Conclusion: Study participants expressed a hope for future expansion of the website to other topics and patient populations. Further study of the Split Decision™ website will be planned to test revisions suggested during by participants during this doctoral project.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectHealth Educationen
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.subjectPatient Educationen
dc.subjectShared Decision Makingen
dc.subjectWeb Studiesen
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.subjectDecision Aidsen
dc.titleDissemination of Patient Decision-Making Aids Via a Web-Based Platformen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberGephart, Shelia M.en
dc.contributor.committeememberShea, Kimberly D.en
dc.contributor.committeememberAnderson, Sue A.en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T15:54:30Z
html.description.abstractPurposes/Aims: The aim of this study was to create a web-based brokerage of patient decision-making aids, titled Split Decision™, and to evaluate student nurse and student nurse practitioners' intent to use and recommend the prototype website based on their perceived usability, usefulness and satisfaction. Rationale/Background: Adult patients frequently report confusion about treatment options, hindering their ability to fully participate in healthcare decision-making. Over 500 patient decision-aids exist on the internet, but are scattered across dozens of websites. Creation of a web-based decision-aid platform would utilize the existing information-seeking habits of patients, but provide them with evidence-based information when evaluating treatment options. Methods: Exemplar decision-aids were chosen from the 563 decision-aids published in the Ottawa Research Institute database and posted on a decision-aid brokerage website. Online access to the website was offered to study participants (n=29) from May to June 2016. Demographic information, quantitative and qualitative responses were collected from each website user and analyzed to evaluate perceived usability, satisfaction, and intention to use the pilot website. Results: Usability of the Split Decision™ website was found to be above average on Systems Usability Scale ratings. Participants rated the website highest on visual appeal and clear terminology on quantitative measures. Qualitative responses cited confusion with the navigation of pages and hyperlinks as areas of future improvement. Conclusion: Study participants expressed a hope for future expansion of the website to other topics and patient populations. Further study of the Split Decision™ website will be planned to test revisions suggested during by participants during this doctoral project.


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