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dc.contributor.authorCopetti, Dario
dc.contributor.authorWing, Rod A.
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-01T23:31:24Z
dc.date.available2016-12-01T23:31:24Z
dc.date.issued2016-09
dc.identifier.citationThe Dark Side of the Genome: Revealing the Native Transposable Element/Repeat Content of Eukaryotic Genomes 2016 Molecular Planten
dc.identifier.issn16742052
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.molp.2016.09.006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621474
dc.description.abstractThe majority of genome assemblies to date fail to represent the true structure of native genomes. This lack of completeness is largely due to the inability to assemble the variable (often significant) fraction of nuclear genomes that is composed primarily of repeated sequences (with either a structural function such as satellite DNA and simple sequence repeats or “selfish DNA” such as high-copy transposable elements [TEs]), herein defined as the “dark side of the genome.” To address this problem, we developed a method to detect and quantify the dark side of the genome and used it to infer the genomic composition and dynamic evolution of the majority of native repeats and TEs present within several test eukaryotic genomes.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the US National Science Foundation under grants #0321678, #0638541, #0822284, and #1026200, the Bud Antle Endowed Chair of Excellence in Agriculture and Life Sciences, and the AXA Chair for Evolutionary Genomics and Genome Biology to R.A.W. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the US National Science Foundation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCELL PRESSen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1674205216302143en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.cell.com/molecular-plant/abstract/S1674-2052(16)30214-3en
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author 2016. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).en
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.titleThe Dark Side of the Genome: Revealing the Native Transposable Element/Repeat Content of Eukaryotic Genomesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentArizona Genomics Institute, BIO5 Institute and School of Plant Sciencesen
dc.identifier.journalMolecular Planten
dc.description.noteOpen access article.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-22T23:34:30Z
html.description.abstractThe majority of genome assemblies to date fail to represent the true structure of native genomes. This lack of completeness is largely due to the inability to assemble the variable (often significant) fraction of nuclear genomes that is composed primarily of repeated sequences (with either a structural function such as satellite DNA and simple sequence repeats or “selfish DNA” such as high-copy transposable elements [TEs]), herein defined as the “dark side of the genome.” To address this problem, we developed a method to detect and quantify the dark side of the genome and used it to infer the genomic composition and dynamic evolution of the majority of native repeats and TEs present within several test eukaryotic genomes.


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Copyright © The Author 2016. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © The Author 2016. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).