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dc.contributor.authorHuang, Qian
dc.contributor.authorTeran Arce, Fernando
dc.contributor.authorLee, Joon
dc.contributor.authorYoon, Ilsun
dc.contributor.authorVillanueva, Joshua
dc.contributor.authorLal, Ratnesh
dc.contributor.authorSirbuly, Donald J.
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-05T18:02:12Z
dc.date.available2016-12-05T18:02:12Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-13
dc.identifier.citationGap controlled plasmon-dielectric coupling effects investigated with single nanoparticle-terminated atomic force microscope probes 2016, 8 (39):17102 Nanoscaleen
dc.identifier.issn2040-3364
dc.identifier.issn2040-3372
dc.identifier.pmid27714046
dc.identifier.doi10.1039/C6NR03432B
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621510
dc.description.abstractPrecise positioning of a plasmonic nanoparticle (NP) near a small dielectric surface is not only necessary for understanding gap-dependent interactions between a metal and dielectric but it is also a critical component in building ultrasensitive molecular rulers and force sensing devices. In this study we investigate the gap-dependent scattering of gold and silver NPs by controllably depositing them on an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and monitoring their scattering within the evanescent field of a tin dioxide nanofiber waveguide. The enhanced distance-dependent scattering profiles due to plasmon-dielectric coupling effects show similar decays for both gold and silver NPs given the strong dependence of the coupling on the decaying power in the near-field. Experiments and simulations also demonstrate that the NPs attached to the AFM tips act as free NPs, eliminating optical interference typically observed from secondary dielectric substrates. With the ability to reproducibly place individual plasmonic NPs on an AFM tip, and optically monitor near-field plasmon-dielectric coupling effects, this approach allows a wide-variety of light-matter interactions studies to be carried out on other low-dimensional nanomaterials.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation [ECCS 1150952]; University of California, Office of the President [UC-LFRP 12-LR-238415]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherROYAL SOC CHEMISTRYen
dc.relation.urlhttp://xlink.rsc.org/?DOI=C6NR03432Ben
dc.rightsCopyright © 2016 The Author(s).
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titleGap controlled plasmon-dielectric coupling effects investigated with single nanoparticle-terminated atomic force microscope probesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Biomed Engn, Dept Med, Div Translat & Regenerat Meden
dc.identifier.journalNanoscaleen
dc.description.note12 Month Embargo.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
refterms.dateFOA2017-09-13T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractPrecise positioning of a plasmonic nanoparticle (NP) near a small dielectric surface is not only necessary for understanding gap-dependent interactions between a metal and dielectric but it is also a critical component in building ultrasensitive molecular rulers and force sensing devices. In this study we investigate the gap-dependent scattering of gold and silver NPs by controllably depositing them on an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and monitoring their scattering within the evanescent field of a tin dioxide nanofiber waveguide. The enhanced distance-dependent scattering profiles due to plasmon-dielectric coupling effects show similar decays for both gold and silver NPs given the strong dependence of the coupling on the decaying power in the near-field. Experiments and simulations also demonstrate that the NPs attached to the AFM tips act as free NPs, eliminating optical interference typically observed from secondary dielectric substrates. With the ability to reproducibly place individual plasmonic NPs on an AFM tip, and optically monitor near-field plasmon-dielectric coupling effects, this approach allows a wide-variety of light-matter interactions studies to be carried out on other low-dimensional nanomaterials.


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