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dc.contributor.authorKozak, Kenneth H.
dc.contributor.authorWiens, John J.
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-08T20:59:28Z
dc.date.available2016-12-08T20:59:28Z
dc.date.issued2016-08
dc.identifier.citationWhat explains patterns of species richness? The relative importance of climatic-niche evolution, morphological evolution, and ecological limits in salamanders 2016, 6 (16):5940 Ecology and Evolutionen
dc.identifier.issn20457758
dc.identifier.pmid27547367
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ece3.2301
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621556
dc.description.abstractA major goal of evolutionary biology and ecology is to understand why species richness varies among clades. Previous studies have suggested that variation in richness among clades might be related to variation in rates of morphological evolution among clades (e.g., body size and shape). Other studies have suggested that richness patterns might be related to variation in rates of climatic-niche evolution. However, few studies, if any, have tested the relative importance of these variables in explaining patterns of richness among clades. Here, we test their relative importance among major clades of Plethodontidae, the most species-rich family of salamanders. Earlier studies have suggested that climatic-niche evolution explains patterns of diversification among plethodontid clades, whereas rates of morphological evolution do not. A subsequent study stated that rates of morphological evolution instead explained patterns of species richness among plethodontid clades (along with "ecological limits" on richness of clades, leading to saturation of clades with species, given limited resources). However, they did not consider climatic-niche evolution. Using phylogenetic multiple regression, we show that rates of climatic-niche evolution explain most variation in richness among plethodontid clades, whereas rates of morphological evolution do not. We find little evidence that ecological limits explain patterns of richness among plethodontid clades. We also test whether rates of morphological and climatic-niche evolution are correlated, and find that they are not. Overall, our results help explain richness patterns in a major amphibian group and provide possibly the first test of the relative importance of climatic niches and morphological evolution in explaining diversity patterns.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation, United States [NSF DEB 094950]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWILEY-BLACKWELLen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ece3.2301en
dc.rights© 2016 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.en
dc.subjectAmphibiansen
dc.subjectclimatic-niche evolutionen
dc.subjectdiversificationen
dc.subjectecological limitsen
dc.subjectmorphological evolutionen
dc.subjectPlethodontidaeen
dc.subjectratesen
dc.subjectsalamandersen
dc.subjectspecies richnessen
dc.titleWhat explains patterns of species richness? The relative importance of climatic-niche evolution, morphological evolution, and ecological limits in salamandersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Ecol & Evoluten
dc.identifier.journalEcology and Evolutionen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
dc.contributor.institutionBell Museum of Natural History and Department of Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology; University of Minnesota; St. Paul Minnesota 55108
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Ecology and Evolution; University of Arizona; Tucson Arizona 85721
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T16:02:20Z
html.description.abstractA major goal of evolutionary biology and ecology is to understand why species richness varies among clades. Previous studies have suggested that variation in richness among clades might be related to variation in rates of morphological evolution among clades (e.g., body size and shape). Other studies have suggested that richness patterns might be related to variation in rates of climatic-niche evolution. However, few studies, if any, have tested the relative importance of these variables in explaining patterns of richness among clades. Here, we test their relative importance among major clades of Plethodontidae, the most species-rich family of salamanders. Earlier studies have suggested that climatic-niche evolution explains patterns of diversification among plethodontid clades, whereas rates of morphological evolution do not. A subsequent study stated that rates of morphological evolution instead explained patterns of species richness among plethodontid clades (along with "ecological limits" on richness of clades, leading to saturation of clades with species, given limited resources). However, they did not consider climatic-niche evolution. Using phylogenetic multiple regression, we show that rates of climatic-niche evolution explain most variation in richness among plethodontid clades, whereas rates of morphological evolution do not. We find little evidence that ecological limits explain patterns of richness among plethodontid clades. We also test whether rates of morphological and climatic-niche evolution are correlated, and find that they are not. Overall, our results help explain richness patterns in a major amphibian group and provide possibly the first test of the relative importance of climatic niches and morphological evolution in explaining diversity patterns.


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