Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKamhi, J. Frances
dc.contributor.authorGronenberg, Wulfila
dc.contributor.authorRobson, Simon K. A.
dc.contributor.authorTraniello, James F. A.
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-12T21:35:06Z
dc.date.available2016-12-12T21:35:06Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-19
dc.identifier.citationSocial complexity influences brain investment and neural operation costs in ants 2016, 283 (1841):20161949 Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciencesen
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.issn1471-2954
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2016.1949
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621590
dc.description.abstractThe metabolic expense of producing and operating neural tissue required for adaptive behaviour is considered a significant selective force in brain evolution. In primates, brain size correlates positively with group size, presumably owing to the greater cognitive demands of complex social relationships in large societies. Social complexity in eusocial insects is also associated with large groups, as well as collective intelligence and division of labour among sterile workers. However, superorganism phenotypes may lower cognitive demands on behaviourally specialized workers resulting in selection for decreased brain size and/or energetic costs of brain metabolism. To test this hypothesis, we compared brain investment patterns and cytochrome oxidase (COX) activity, a proxy for ATP usage, in two ant species contrasting in social organization. Socially complex Oecophylla smaragdina workers had larger brain size and relative investment in the mushroom bodies (MBs)-higher order sensory processing compartments-than the more socially basic Formica subsericea workers. Oecophylla smaragdina workers, however, had reduced COX activity in the MBs. Our results suggest that as in primates, ant group size is associated with large brain size. The elevated costs of investment in metabolically expensive brain tissue in the socially complex O. smaragdina, however, appear to be offset by decreased energetic costs.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation (NSF) East Asia and Pacific Summer Institute [1209967]; NSF [IOB-0725013, IOS-1354291]; Australian Research Council [1093553]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherROYAL SOCen
dc.relation.urlhttp://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/lookup/doi/10.1098/rspb.2016.1949en
dc.rights© 2016 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectmetabolic costen
dc.subjectsocial brain evolutionen
dc.subjectpolymorphismen
dc.subjectcollective intelligenceen
dc.subjectcytochrome oxidaseen
dc.titleSocial complexity influences brain investment and neural operation costs in antsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Neuroscien
dc.identifier.journalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciencesen
dc.description.notePublished 19 October 2016; 12 month embargo.
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
refterms.dateFOA2017-10-19T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractThe metabolic expense of producing and operating neural tissue required for adaptive behaviour is considered a significant selective force in brain evolution. In primates, brain size correlates positively with group size, presumably owing to the greater cognitive demands of complex social relationships in large societies. Social complexity in eusocial insects is also associated with large groups, as well as collective intelligence and division of labour among sterile workers. However, superorganism phenotypes may lower cognitive demands on behaviourally specialized workers resulting in selection for decreased brain size and/or energetic costs of brain metabolism. To test this hypothesis, we compared brain investment patterns and cytochrome oxidase (COX) activity, a proxy for ATP usage, in two ant species contrasting in social organization. Socially complex Oecophylla smaragdina workers had larger brain size and relative investment in the mushroom bodies (MBs)-higher order sensory processing compartments-than the more socially basic Formica subsericea workers. Oecophylla smaragdina workers, however, had reduced COX activity in the MBs. Our results suggest that as in primates, ant group size is associated with large brain size. The elevated costs of investment in metabolically expensive brain tissue in the socially complex O. smaragdina, however, appear to be offset by decreased energetic costs.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Kamhi_et_al._2016_PRSb_final_a ...
Size:
262.9Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final Accepted Manuscript

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record