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dc.contributor.authorFrieden, B. Roy
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-14T17:35:17Z
dc.date.available2016-12-14T17:35:17Z
dc.date.issued1969-01-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621629
dc.descriptionQC 351 A7 no. 34en
dc.description.abstractDespite its necessarily finite aperture, an optical system can theoretically be coated to produce arbitrarily perfect imagery over a limited field. When the object is of limited extent, this field can be made the optical conjugate to the object, so that the whole object is imaged with arbitrary precision. The required pupil coating approximates low- contrast cosine fringes over its central region; toward the aperture edge the frequency and amplitude rapidly accelerate. The maximum occurs as a narrow spike. The frequency near the central region varies directly with the total extent of the conjugate field and inversely with the required central core width A in the point amplitude response. As t is made arbitrarily narrow, the point amplitude response approaches the form of a sinc function over the field of view. This function is precisely the point amplitude for a diffraction-limited pupil with a magnified aperture of 1/A times the given pupil aperture! The only image property that is not in compliance with this effective aperture magnification is that of total illumination. This is severely reduced from that of the original, uncoated aperture, and is the major restriction on practical use of the derived pupil. Applications to microscopy and telescopy are discussed.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherOptical Sciences Center, University of Arizona (Tucson, Arizona)en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOptical Sciences Technical Report 34en
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regents
dc.subjectOptics.en
dc.titleON ARBITRARILY PERFECT IMAGERY WITH A FINITE APERTUREen_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten
dc.description.collectioninformationThis title from the Optical Sciences Technical Reports collection is made available by the College of Optical Sciences and the University Libraries, The University of Arizona. If you have questions about titles in this collection, please contact repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T16:11:09Z
html.description.abstractDespite its necessarily finite aperture, an optical system can theoretically be coated to produce arbitrarily perfect imagery over a limited field. When the object is of limited extent, this field can be made the optical conjugate to the object, so that the whole object is imaged with arbitrary precision. The required pupil coating approximates low- contrast cosine fringes over its central region; toward the aperture edge the frequency and amplitude rapidly accelerate. The maximum occurs as a narrow spike. The frequency near the central region varies directly with the total extent of the conjugate field and inversely with the required central core width A in the point amplitude response. As t is made arbitrarily narrow, the point amplitude response approaches the form of a sinc function over the field of view. This function is precisely the point amplitude for a diffraction-limited pupil with a magnified aperture of 1/A times the given pupil aperture! The only image property that is not in compliance with this effective aperture magnification is that of total illumination. This is severely reduced from that of the original, uncoated aperture, and is the major restriction on practical use of the derived pupil. Applications to microscopy and telescopy are discussed.


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