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dc.contributor.authorLu, Yi
dc.contributor.authorRen, Qinlong
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Tingting
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Siu Ling
dc.contributor.authorGau, Vincent
dc.contributor.authorLiao, Joseph C.
dc.contributor.authorChan, Cho Lik
dc.contributor.authorWong, Pak Kin
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-15T16:54:04Z
dc.date.available2016-12-15T16:54:04Z
dc.date.issued2016-07
dc.identifier.citationLong-range electrothermal fluid motion in microfluidic systems 2016, 98:341 International Journal of Heat and Mass Transferen
dc.identifier.issn00179310
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2016.03.034
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621709
dc.description.abstractAC electrothermal flow (ACEF) is the fluid motion created as a result of Joule heating induced temperature gradients. ACEF is capable of performing major microfluidic operations, such as pumping, mixing, concentration, separation and assay enhancement, and is effective in biological samples with a wide range of electrical conductivity. Here, we report long-range fluid motion induced by ACEF, which creates centimeter-scale vortices. The long-range fluid motion displays a strong voltage dependence and is suppressed in microchannels with a characteristic length below similar to 300 mu m. An extended computational model of ACEF, which considers the effects of the density gradient and temperature-dependent parameters, is developed and compared experimentally by particle image velocimetry. The model captures the essence of ACEF in a wide range of channel dimensions and operating conditions. The combined experimental and computational study reveals the essential roles of buoyancy, temperature rise, and associated changes in material properties in the formation of the long-range fluid motion. Our results provide critical information for the design and modeling of ACEF based microfluidic systems toward various bioanalytical applications. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health (R44AI088756 and DP2OD007161). The authors would like to thank Jose Miguel Valdez and Minqing Li for their valuable discussion and suggestions.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0017931015300806en
dc.rightsCopyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectAC electrothermal flowen
dc.subjectElectrokineticsen
dc.subjectMicrofluidicsen
dc.subjectBuoyancyen
dc.subjectComputational fluid dynamicsen
dc.titleLong-range electrothermal fluid motion in microfluidic systemsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Aerosp & Mech Engnen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Meden
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Heat and Mass Transferen
dc.description.noteAvailable online 25 March 2016; 24 Month Embargo.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
refterms.dateFOA2018-03-26T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractAC electrothermal flow (ACEF) is the fluid motion created as a result of Joule heating induced temperature gradients. ACEF is capable of performing major microfluidic operations, such as pumping, mixing, concentration, separation and assay enhancement, and is effective in biological samples with a wide range of electrical conductivity. Here, we report long-range fluid motion induced by ACEF, which creates centimeter-scale vortices. The long-range fluid motion displays a strong voltage dependence and is suppressed in microchannels with a characteristic length below similar to 300 mu m. An extended computational model of ACEF, which considers the effects of the density gradient and temperature-dependent parameters, is developed and compared experimentally by particle image velocimetry. The model captures the essence of ACEF in a wide range of channel dimensions and operating conditions. The combined experimental and computational study reveals the essential roles of buoyancy, temperature rise, and associated changes in material properties in the formation of the long-range fluid motion. Our results provide critical information for the design and modeling of ACEF based microfluidic systems toward various bioanalytical applications. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


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