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dc.contributor.authorCornell, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-15T17:12:09Z
dc.date.available2016-12-15T17:12:09Z
dc.date.issued2015-09
dc.identifier.citationProcesses of Native Nationhood: The Indigenous Politics of Self-Government 2015, 6 (4) International Indigenous Policy Journalen
dc.identifier.issn19165781
dc.identifier.doi10.18584/iipj.2015.6.4.4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621710
dc.description.abstractOver the last three decades, Indigenous peoples in the CANZUS countries (Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the United States) have been reclaiming self-government as an Indigenous right and practice. In the process, they have been asserting various forms of Indigenous nationhood. This article argues that this development involves a common set of activities on the part of Indigenous peoples: (1) identifying as a nation or a people (determining who the appropriate collective "self " is in self-determination and self-government); (2) organizing as a political body (not just as a corporate holder of assets); and (3) acting on behalf of Indigenous goals (asserting and exercising practical decision-making power and responsibility, even in cases where central governments deny recognition). The article compares these activities in the four countries and argues that, while contexts and circumstances differ, the Indigenous politics of self-government show striking commonalities across the four. Among those commonalities: it is a positional as opposed to a distributional politics; while not ignoring individual welfare, it measures success in terms of collective power; and it focuses less on what central governments are willing to do in the way of recognition and rights than on what Indigenous nations or communities can do for themselves.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUNIV WESTERN ONTARIOen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ir.lib.uwo.ca/iipj/vol6/iss4/4/en
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License. Copyright is held by the author(s) or the publisher. If your intended use exceeds the permitted uses specified by the license, contact the publisher for more information.en
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectself-governanceen
dc.subjectself-determinationen
dc.subjectnationhooden
dc.subjectIndigenous rightsen
dc.subjectUnited Statesen
dc.subjectCanadaen
dc.subjectAustraliaen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.titleProcesses of Native Nationhood: The Indigenous Politics of Self-Governmenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Indigenous Policy Journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-23T05:23:34Z
html.description.abstractOver the last three decades, Indigenous peoples in the CANZUS countries (Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the United States) have been reclaiming self-government as an Indigenous right and practice. In the process, they have been asserting various forms of Indigenous nationhood. This article argues that this development involves a common set of activities on the part of Indigenous peoples: (1) identifying as a nation or a people (determining who the appropriate collective "self " is in self-determination and self-government); (2) organizing as a political body (not just as a corporate holder of assets); and (3) acting on behalf of Indigenous goals (asserting and exercising practical decision-making power and responsibility, even in cases where central governments deny recognition). The article compares these activities in the four countries and argues that, while contexts and circumstances differ, the Indigenous politics of self-government show striking commonalities across the four. Among those commonalities: it is a positional as opposed to a distributional politics; while not ignoring individual welfare, it measures success in terms of collective power; and it focuses less on what central governments are willing to do in the way of recognition and rights than on what Indigenous nations or communities can do for themselves.


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License. Copyright is held by the author(s) or the publisher. If your intended use exceeds the permitted uses specified by the license, contact the publisher for more information.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License. Copyright is held by the author(s) or the publisher. If your intended use exceeds the permitted uses specified by the license, contact the publisher for more information.