Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorOsterberg, Lars*
dc.contributor.authorHatem, David*
dc.contributor.authorMoynahan, Kevin*
dc.contributor.authorShochet, Rob*
dc.contributor.authorGoldstein, Erika*
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-16T00:14:41Z
dc.date.available2016-12-16T00:14:41Z
dc.date.issued2016-05
dc.identifier.citationBack to the Future: What Learning Communities Offer to Medical Education 2016:67 Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Developmenten
dc.identifier.issn2382-1205
dc.identifier.doi10.4137/JMECD.S39420
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621731
dc.description.abstractLearning communities (LCs) have increasingly been incorporated into undergraduate medical education at a number of medical schools in the United States over the past decade. In an Association of Medical Colleges survey of 140 medical schools, 102 schools indicated that they had LC (described as colleges or mentorship groups; https://www.aamc.org/initiatives/cir/425510/19a.html). LCs share an overarching principle of establishing longitudinal relationships with students and faculty, but differ in the emphasis on specific components that may include curriculum delivery, advising/mentoring, student wellness, and community. The creation of LCs requires institutional commitment to reorganize educational processes to become more student centered. LCs are beginning to show positive outcomes for students including benefits related to clinical skills development, advising, and student wellness, in addition to positive outcomes for LC faculty.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLIBERTAS ACADen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.la-press.com/back-to-the-future-what-learning-communities-offer-to-medical-educatio-article-a5622en
dc.rights© the authors, publisher and licensee Libertas Academica Limited. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons CC-BY-NC 3.0 Licenseen
dc.subjectlearning communityen
dc.subjectmentoringen
dc.subjectadvisingen
dc.subjectprofessional developmenten
dc.titleBack to the Future: What Learning Communities Offer to Medical Educationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, Meden
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Medical Education and Curricular Developmenten
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-25T14:45:42Z
html.description.abstractLearning communities (LCs) have increasingly been incorporated into undergraduate medical education at a number of medical schools in the United States over the past decade. In an Association of Medical Colleges survey of 140 medical schools, 102 schools indicated that they had LC (described as colleges or mentorship groups; https://www.aamc.org/initiatives/cir/425510/19a.html). LCs share an overarching principle of establishing longitudinal relationships with students and faculty, but differ in the emphasis on specific components that may include curriculum delivery, advising/mentoring, student wellness, and community. The creation of LCs requires institutional commitment to reorganize educational processes to become more student centered. LCs are beginning to show positive outcomes for students including benefits related to clinical skills development, advising, and student wellness, in addition to positive outcomes for LC faculty.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
f_5622-JMECD-Back-to-the-Futur ...
Size:
745.0Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final Published Version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record