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dc.contributor.authorHunter, Molly E.
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-16T20:16:33Z
dc.date.available2016-12-16T20:16:33Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationOutcomes of fire research: is science used? 2016, 25 (5):495 International Journal of Wildland Fireen
dc.identifier.issn1049-8001
dc.identifier.doi10.1071/WF15202
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621750
dc.description.abstractAn assessment of outcomes from research projects funded by the Joint Fire Science Program was conducted to determine whether or not science has been used to inform management and policy decisions and to explore factors that facilitate use of fire science. In a web survey and follow-up phone interviews, I asked boundary spanners and scientists about how findings from a random sample of 48 projects had been applied and factors that acted as barriers or facilitators to science application. In addition, I conducted an investigation of recent planning documents to determine whether products from the sampled projects were cited. All lines of evidence suggest that information from most (44 of 48) of these projects have been used by fire and fuels managers in some capacity. Science has mostly been used during planning efforts, to develop treatment prescriptions, and to evaluate current practices. Lack of manager awareness was commonly identified as a barrier to application of science. Conversely, activities and organisations that foster interaction between scientists and managers were identified as facilitating the application of science. The efforts of the Joint Fire Science Program to communicate science findings and engage managers has likely contributed to the application of fire science.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded by the JFSP. Vita Wright and Sarah Trainor provided very useful advice on development of the project objectives and methodology. All members of the JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network were instrumental in providing information on boundary spanners in different regions. John Cissel and Alison Meadow provided insightful comments on earlier drafts of the manuscript. I thank them all for critical support throughout the project.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCSIRO PUBLISHINGen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.publish.csiro.au/?paper=WF15202en
dc.rightsJournal compilation © IAWF 2016en
dc.subjectcommunicationen
dc.subjectplanningen
dc.subjectpolicyen
dc.titleOutcomes of fire research: is science used?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Nat Resources & Environmen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Wildland Fireen
dc.description.noteAll journals published by CSIRO Publishing allow authors to deposit the Accepted version of their manuscript into an institutional repository or put it on a personal website, with no embargo.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T16:24:46Z
html.description.abstractAn assessment of outcomes from research projects funded by the Joint Fire Science Program was conducted to determine whether or not science has been used to inform management and policy decisions and to explore factors that facilitate use of fire science. In a web survey and follow-up phone interviews, I asked boundary spanners and scientists about how findings from a random sample of 48 projects had been applied and factors that acted as barriers or facilitators to science application. In addition, I conducted an investigation of recent planning documents to determine whether products from the sampled projects were cited. All lines of evidence suggest that information from most (44 of 48) of these projects have been used by fire and fuels managers in some capacity. Science has mostly been used during planning efforts, to develop treatment prescriptions, and to evaluate current practices. Lack of manager awareness was commonly identified as a barrier to application of science. Conversely, activities and organisations that foster interaction between scientists and managers were identified as facilitating the application of science. The efforts of the Joint Fire Science Program to communicate science findings and engage managers has likely contributed to the application of fire science.


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