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dc.contributor.authorContreras, Yissel
dc.contributor.authorMuscat, Anthony J.
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-19T23:05:15Z
dc.date.available2016-12-19T23:05:15Z
dc.date.issued2016-05
dc.identifier.citationSelf-assembly of a 1-eicosanethiolate layer on InSb(100) 2016, 370:67 Applied Surface Scienceen
dc.identifier.issn01694332
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.apsusc.2016.02.099
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621766
dc.description.abstract1-eicosanethiolate molecules form relatively weak bonds with the surface of InSb(100) limiting the order of the self-assembled monolayer despite the long length of the alkyl chain. Heating to only 225 °C in vacuum completely desorbed the eicosanethiolate layer from the surface based on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Even after deposition times as long as 20 h in ethanol, the asymmetric methylene stretch was at 2925 cm-1 in the attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectrum, which is indicative of alkane chains that are incompletely ordered. Atomic force microscopy images combined with ellipsometry showed that the eicosanethiolate layer conformed to the rough InSb(100) starting surface (2.3±0.2 nm RMS). The reoxidation kinetics in air of InSb(100) and InSb(111)B covered with eicosanethiolate layers was the same despite the lower surface roughness of the latter (0.64±0.14 nm). The bond that the S head group makes with the substrate is the primary factor that determines the cohesiveness of the molecules on the surface. Although interactions between the alkane chains in the layer are sufficient to form a self-assembled layer, the fluidity of the molecules in the layer compromised the chemical passivation of the surface resulting in reoxidation in air after 20 minutes.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0169433216302689en
dc.rightsCopyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectPassivationen
dc.subjectSelf-assemblyen
dc.subjectLiquid phaseen
dc.subjectEicosanethiolen
dc.subjectInSb(100)en
dc.titleSelf-assembly of a 1-eicosanethiolate layer on InSb(100)en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalApplied Surface Scienceen
dc.description.noteAvailable online 11 February 2016; 24 month embargo.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
refterms.dateFOA2018-02-12T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstract1-eicosanethiolate molecules form relatively weak bonds with the surface of InSb(100) limiting the order of the self-assembled monolayer despite the long length of the alkyl chain. Heating to only 225 °C in vacuum completely desorbed the eicosanethiolate layer from the surface based on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Even after deposition times as long as 20 h in ethanol, the asymmetric methylene stretch was at 2925 cm-1 in the attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectrum, which is indicative of alkane chains that are incompletely ordered. Atomic force microscopy images combined with ellipsometry showed that the eicosanethiolate layer conformed to the rough InSb(100) starting surface (2.3±0.2 nm RMS). The reoxidation kinetics in air of InSb(100) and InSb(111)B covered with eicosanethiolate layers was the same despite the lower surface roughness of the latter (0.64±0.14 nm). The bond that the S head group makes with the substrate is the primary factor that determines the cohesiveness of the molecules on the surface. Although interactions between the alkane chains in the layer are sufficient to form a self-assembled layer, the fluidity of the molecules in the layer compromised the chemical passivation of the surface resulting in reoxidation in air after 20 minutes.


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