Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWicker, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorYu, Yeisoo
dc.contributor.authorHaberer, Georg
dc.contributor.authorMayer, Klaus F. X.
dc.contributor.authorMarri, Pradeep Reddy
dc.contributor.authorRounsley, Steve
dc.contributor.authorChen, Mingsheng
dc.contributor.authorZuccolo, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorPanaud, Olivier
dc.contributor.authorWing, Rod A.
dc.contributor.authorRoffler, Stefan
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-20T17:53:45Z
dc.date.available2016-12-20T17:53:45Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-07
dc.identifier.citationDNA transposon activity is associated with increased mutation rates in genes of rice and other grasses 2016, 7:12790 Nature Communicationsen
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.pmid27599761
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms12790
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621772
dc.description.abstractDNA (class 2) transposons are mobile genetic elements which move within their 'host' genome through excising and re-inserting elsewhere. Although the rice genome contains tens of thousands of such elements, their actual role in evolution is still unclear. Analysing over 650 transposon polymorphisms in the rice species Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima, we find that DNA repair following transposon excisions is associated with an increased number of mutations in the sequences neighbouring the transposon. Indeed, the 3,000 bp flanking the excised transposons can contain over 10 times more mutations than the genome-wide average. Since DNA transposons preferably insert near genes, this is correlated with increases in mutation rates in coding sequences and regulatory regions. Most importantly, we find this phenomenon also in maize, wheat and barley. Thus, these findings suggest that DNA transposon activity is a major evolutionary force in grasses which provide the basis of most food consumed by humankind.
dc.description.sponsorshipSwiss National Foundation [31003A_138505/1]; US National Science Foundation [0321678, 0638541, 0822284, 1026200]; Bud Antle Endowed Chair of Excellence in Agriculture and Life Sciences; AXA Endowed Chair of Genome Biology and Evolutionary Genomicsen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUPen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ncomms12790en
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2016. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en
dc.titleDNA transposon activity is associated with increased mutation rates in genes of rice and other grassesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Arizona Genom Inst, Sch Plant Scien
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biolen
dc.identifier.journalNature Communicationsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T16:31:53Z
html.description.abstractDNA (class 2) transposons are mobile genetic elements which move within their 'host' genome through excising and re-inserting elsewhere. Although the rice genome contains tens of thousands of such elements, their actual role in evolution is still unclear. Analysing over 650 transposon polymorphisms in the rice species Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima, we find that DNA repair following transposon excisions is associated with an increased number of mutations in the sequences neighbouring the transposon. Indeed, the 3,000 bp flanking the excised transposons can contain over 10 times more mutations than the genome-wide average. Since DNA transposons preferably insert near genes, this is correlated with increases in mutation rates in coding sequences and regulatory regions. Most importantly, we find this phenomenon also in maize, wheat and barley. Thus, these findings suggest that DNA transposon activity is a major evolutionary force in grasses which provide the basis of most food consumed by humankind.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
ncomms12790.pdf
Size:
1.432Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final Published Version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record