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dc.contributor.advisorRhoades, Gary D.en
dc.contributor.authorRogers, Gregory S.*
dc.creatorRogers, Gregory S.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-21T16:59:52Z
dc.date.available2016-12-21T16:59:52Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621790
dc.description.abstractIn 2013, one of the largest community college districts in the nation set forth a set of policies intended to improve the persistence and academic achievement of its sizable student population. Policies such as a new student orientation, course placement testing, and academic advising were now required of all first-time students who had their sights set on a degree or transfer to a four-year institution. One policy, however, was only applicable to those students who failed to demonstrate preparedness in the areas of reading, math, or English. For this cohort of students, an additional student success course was mandated that was intended to give these students the academic skills and confidence to persist that they were presumed to lack. While the student success course had been available in the district since the 1980s, it had never been a required course in the district even though many other higher education institutions had adopted it as such. There was no clear rationale as to why this course needed to be required starting in 2013, or why it was being required only of underprepared students. Further, little in the way of preparation occurred or resources provided to ensure the smooth and complete implementation throughout the ten-college district and there were no plans to evaluate the course's effectiveness other than measure each college's compliance to the policy. Thus the stage was set for a multi-lensed analysis of an entire policy lifecycle rather than the typical summative assessment of a policy's implementation. From formation to implementation to effectiveness, this single policy intervention in a single community college district is evaluated formatively. While each substantive formative analysis' content could stand alone, it is the intent of this dissertation to suggest and demonstrate that all are necessary for a complete evaluation of an educational policy.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectFirst Year Seminaren
dc.subjectPolicy Analysisen
dc.subjectPolicy Implementationen
dc.subjectVirtual Adoptionen
dc.subjectHigher Educationen
dc.subjectCommunity College Administrationen
dc.titleMandating Student Success: A Multi-Lensed Analysis of an Institutional Policy Intervention on Community College Student Successen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberRhoades, Gary D.en
dc.contributor.committeememberDeil-Amen, Reginaen
dc.contributor.committeememberJaquette, Ozanen
dc.contributor.committeememberKienzl, Gregory S.en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-26T22:20:49Z
html.description.abstractIn 2013, one of the largest community college districts in the nation set forth a set of policies intended to improve the persistence and academic achievement of its sizable student population. Policies such as a new student orientation, course placement testing, and academic advising were now required of all first-time students who had their sights set on a degree or transfer to a four-year institution. One policy, however, was only applicable to those students who failed to demonstrate preparedness in the areas of reading, math, or English. For this cohort of students, an additional student success course was mandated that was intended to give these students the academic skills and confidence to persist that they were presumed to lack. While the student success course had been available in the district since the 1980s, it had never been a required course in the district even though many other higher education institutions had adopted it as such. There was no clear rationale as to why this course needed to be required starting in 2013, or why it was being required only of underprepared students. Further, little in the way of preparation occurred or resources provided to ensure the smooth and complete implementation throughout the ten-college district and there were no plans to evaluate the course's effectiveness other than measure each college's compliance to the policy. Thus the stage was set for a multi-lensed analysis of an entire policy lifecycle rather than the typical summative assessment of a policy's implementation. From formation to implementation to effectiveness, this single policy intervention in a single community college district is evaluated formatively. While each substantive formative analysis' content could stand alone, it is the intent of this dissertation to suggest and demonstrate that all are necessary for a complete evaluation of an educational policy.


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