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dc.contributor.advisorLivingston, Peteren
dc.contributor.advisorSlack, Donalden
dc.contributor.authorHung, Isaac
dc.creatorHung, Isaacen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-03T16:23:39Z
dc.date.available2017-01-03T16:23:39Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621853
dc.description.abstractUltrafine bubbles, often referred to as nanobubbles, have been used in various applications from environmental remediation to medicine. Even though the technology to generate ultrafine bubbles has been around for many years, the full potential of its applications has not been completely studied. This project seeks to study the use of ultrafine bubble technology for water treatment in combination with ozone gas. A factorial design experiment was chosen to test the effects of ultrafine bubbles on the concentration of an indicator organism, E. coli, in water as well as their effects on ozone gas being injected into water. Ozone gas or nitrogen gas was injected into water contaminated with E. coli as either ultrafine bubbles or fine bubbles as treatments for up to 60 minutes. Ultrafine bubbles were found to not have any significant effect on the concentration of E. coli in water. However, ultrafine bubbles did provide benefits when used in conjunction with ozone gas that regular, fine bubbles did not provide. The benefits included allowing the concentration of dissolved ozone in the water to decrease at a slower rate as well as allowing more ozone to dissolve into water at a higher rate than conventional methods of bubbling in ozone. While in this particular set of experiments the concentration of dissolved ozone in water didn't surpass 2 mg/L, which didn't allow for rapid disinfection and treatment of water, it is believed that with a more powerful ozone generator better results can be achieved. This project demonstrates the benefits and potential of injecting ozone gas as ultrafine bubbles into water as a way to effectively and efficiently disinfect and treat water.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectOzonationen
dc.subjectOzoneen
dc.subjectUltrafine Bubbleen
dc.subjectVenturien
dc.subjectWater Treatmenten
dc.subjectAgricultural & Biosystems Engineeringen
dc.subjectNanobubbleen
dc.titleUltrafine Bubble-Enhanced Ozonation For Water Treatmenten_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
dc.contributor.committeememberYitayew, Mulunehen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural & Biosystems Engineeringen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-12T14:30:53Z
html.description.abstractUltrafine bubbles, often referred to as nanobubbles, have been used in various applications from environmental remediation to medicine. Even though the technology to generate ultrafine bubbles has been around for many years, the full potential of its applications has not been completely studied. This project seeks to study the use of ultrafine bubble technology for water treatment in combination with ozone gas. A factorial design experiment was chosen to test the effects of ultrafine bubbles on the concentration of an indicator organism, E. coli, in water as well as their effects on ozone gas being injected into water. Ozone gas or nitrogen gas was injected into water contaminated with E. coli as either ultrafine bubbles or fine bubbles as treatments for up to 60 minutes. Ultrafine bubbles were found to not have any significant effect on the concentration of E. coli in water. However, ultrafine bubbles did provide benefits when used in conjunction with ozone gas that regular, fine bubbles did not provide. The benefits included allowing the concentration of dissolved ozone in the water to decrease at a slower rate as well as allowing more ozone to dissolve into water at a higher rate than conventional methods of bubbling in ozone. While in this particular set of experiments the concentration of dissolved ozone in water didn't surpass 2 mg/L, which didn't allow for rapid disinfection and treatment of water, it is believed that with a more powerful ozone generator better results can be achieved. This project demonstrates the benefits and potential of injecting ozone gas as ultrafine bubbles into water as a way to effectively and efficiently disinfect and treat water.


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