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dc.contributor.advisorAllen, John J.B.en
dc.contributor.authorLewin, Rivian Kenyan
dc.creatorLewin, Rivian Kenyanen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-12T17:22:56Z
dc.date.available2017-01-12T17:22:56Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621934
dc.description.abstractCollege and graduate school are periods in life often filled with challenges and transitions. Multi-component psychosocial approaches to stress management and student wellness are likely to offer the greatest benefit, while individual responses to these approaches are expected to differ. In a circumscribed analysis of the first wave of a larger randomized controlled trial, data were evaluated from 20 college-aged students (16 female, 4 male) randomly assigned to complete one of two workshops. One workshop (YES+) focused on yogic breathing and social connectedness and the other workshop (WOW!) focused on cognitive stress management techniques. Both workshops entailed 18 hours training across four consecutive days. Questionnaires regarding perceived stress and personality wre collected pre- and post-workshop, in addition to EKG data in the context of a laboratory psychosocial stress induction. While YES+ demonstrated a pre-post workshop increase in Conscientiousness scores on the Big-5 Personality Inventory, improvements on heart rate metrics related to the stress induction task were most prominently observed for WOW!. When collapsing across both groups, baseline Agreeableness was a personality predictor of intervention-related reductions in heart rate during the experimental stress task. These results have important implications for understanding benefits that may be obtained from student wellness workshops in terms of adaptive stress physiology in daily life.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titlePersonality Trait Predictors of Psychophysiological Changes Following Two Stress-Management Workshops in College Studentsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T16:48:51Z
html.description.abstractCollege and graduate school are periods in life often filled with challenges and transitions. Multi-component psychosocial approaches to stress management and student wellness are likely to offer the greatest benefit, while individual responses to these approaches are expected to differ. In a circumscribed analysis of the first wave of a larger randomized controlled trial, data were evaluated from 20 college-aged students (16 female, 4 male) randomly assigned to complete one of two workshops. One workshop (YES+) focused on yogic breathing and social connectedness and the other workshop (WOW!) focused on cognitive stress management techniques. Both workshops entailed 18 hours training across four consecutive days. Questionnaires regarding perceived stress and personality wre collected pre- and post-workshop, in addition to EKG data in the context of a laboratory psychosocial stress induction. While YES+ demonstrated a pre-post workshop increase in Conscientiousness scores on the Big-5 Personality Inventory, improvements on heart rate metrics related to the stress induction task were most prominently observed for WOW!. When collapsing across both groups, baseline Agreeableness was a personality predictor of intervention-related reductions in heart rate during the experimental stress task. These results have important implications for understanding benefits that may be obtained from student wellness workshops in terms of adaptive stress physiology in daily life.


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