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dc.contributor.authorMcGuire, Luke A.
dc.contributor.authorRengers, Francis K.
dc.contributor.authorKean, Jason W.
dc.contributor.authorCoe, Jeffrey A.
dc.contributor.authorMirus, Benjamin B.
dc.contributor.authorBaum, Rex L.
dc.contributor.authorGodt, Jonathan W.
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-13T23:52:01Z
dc.date.available2017-01-13T23:52:01Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-16
dc.identifier.citationElucidating the role of vegetation in the initiation of rainfall-induced shallow landslides: Insights from an extreme rainfall event in the Colorado Front Range 2016, 43 (17):9084 Geophysical Research Lettersen
dc.identifier.issn00948276
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2016GL070741
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/621986
dc.description.abstractMore than 1100 debris flows were mobilized from shallow landslides during a rainstorm from 9 to 13 September 2013 in the Colorado Front Range, with the vast majority initiating on sparsely vegetated, south facing terrain. To investigate the physical processes responsible for the observed aspect control, we made measurements of soil properties on a densely forested north facing hillslope and a grassland-dominated south facing hillslope in the Colorado Front Range and performed numerical modeling of transient changes in soil pore water pressure throughout the rainstorm. Using the numerical model, we quantitatively assessed interactions among vegetation, rainfall interception, subsurface hydrology, and slope stability. Results suggest that apparent cohesion supplied by roots was responsible for the observed connection between debris flow initiation and slope aspect. Results suggest that future climate-driven modifications to forest structure could substantially influence landslide hazards throughout the Front Range and similar water-limited environments where vegetation communities may be more susceptible to small variations in climate.
dc.description.sponsorshipU.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Landslide Hazards Programen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAMER GEOPHYSICAL UNIONen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL070741en
dc.rights©2016. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.en
dc.subjectdebris flowen
dc.subjectvegetationen
dc.subjectlandslideen
dc.subjectrainfallen
dc.subjectFront Rangeen
dc.subjectslope aspecten
dc.titleElucidating the role of vegetation in the initiation of rainfall-induced shallow landslides: Insights from an extreme rainfall event in the Colorado Front Rangeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Geoscien
dc.identifier.journalGeophysical Research Lettersen
dc.description.noteFirst published: 14 September 2016; 6 Month Embargo.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
dc.contributor.institutionU.S. Geological Survey; Denver Colorado USA
dc.contributor.institutionU.S. Geological Survey; Denver Colorado USA
dc.contributor.institutionU.S. Geological Survey; Denver Colorado USA
dc.contributor.institutionU.S. Geological Survey; Denver Colorado USA
dc.contributor.institutionU.S. Geological Survey; Denver Colorado USA
dc.contributor.institutionU.S. Geological Survey; Denver Colorado USA
dc.contributor.institutionU.S. Geological Survey; Denver Colorado USA
refterms.dateFOA2017-03-15T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractMore than 1100 debris flows were mobilized from shallow landslides during a rainstorm from 9 to 13 September 2013 in the Colorado Front Range, with the vast majority initiating on sparsely vegetated, south facing terrain. To investigate the physical processes responsible for the observed aspect control, we made measurements of soil properties on a densely forested north facing hillslope and a grassland-dominated south facing hillslope in the Colorado Front Range and performed numerical modeling of transient changes in soil pore water pressure throughout the rainstorm. Using the numerical model, we quantitatively assessed interactions among vegetation, rainfall interception, subsurface hydrology, and slope stability. Results suggest that apparent cohesion supplied by roots was responsible for the observed connection between debris flow initiation and slope aspect. Results suggest that future climate-driven modifications to forest structure could substantially influence landslide hazards throughout the Front Range and similar water-limited environments where vegetation communities may be more susceptible to small variations in climate.


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