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dc.contributor.authorMahmoud, Abeer M.*
dc.contributor.authorAl-Alem, Umaima*
dc.contributor.authorDabbous, Firas*
dc.contributor.authorAli, Mohamed M.*
dc.contributor.authorBatai, Ken*
dc.contributor.authorShah, Ebony*
dc.contributor.authorKittles, Rick A.*
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-24T00:14:26Z
dc.date.available2017-01-24T00:14:26Z
dc.date.issued2016-11-08
dc.identifier.citationZinc Intake and Risk of Prostate Cancer: Case-Control Study and Meta-Analysis 2016, 11 (11):e0165956 PLOS ONEen
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.pmid27824905
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0165956
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622118
dc.description.abstractZinc is an essential dietary element that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer, a cancer that disproportionately affects men of African descent. Studies assessing the association of zinc intake and prostate cancer have yielded inconsistent results. Furthermore, very little is known about the relationship between zinc intake and prostate cancer among African Americans. We examined the association between self-reported zinc intake and prostate cancer in a hospital-based case-control study of African Americans. We then compared our results with previous studies by performing a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence regarding the association between zinc and prostate cancer. Newly diagnosed African American men with histologically confirmed prostate cancer (n = 127) and controls (n = 81) were recruited from an urban academic urology clinic in Washington, DC. Controls had higher zinc intake, with a mean of 14 mg/day versus 11 mg/day for cases. We observed a non-significant, non-linear increase in prostate cancer when comparing tertiles of zinc intake (OR (<6.5 vs 6.5-12.5mg/day) 1.8, 95% CI: 0.6,5.6; OR (<6.5 vs >12.5mg/day) 1.3, 95% CI: 0.2,6.5). The pooled estimate from 17 studies (including 3 cohorts, 2 nested case-control, 11 case-control studies, and 1 randomized clinical trial, with a total of 111,199 participants and 11,689 cases of prostate cancer) was 1.07 (hi vs lo) 95% CI: 0.98-1.16. Using a dose-response meta-analysis, we observed a non-linear trend in the relationship between zinc intake and prostate cancer (p for nonlinearity = 0.0022). This is the first study to examine the relationship between zinc intake in black men and risk of prostate cancer and systematically evaluate available epidemiologic evidence about the magnitude of the relationship between zinc intake and prostate cancer. Despite of the lower intake of zinc by prostate cancer patients, our meta-analysis indicated that there is no evidence for an association between zinc intake and prostate cancer.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health [5U54CA91431-01]; Egyptian Ministry of Higher Education [GM842]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCEen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0165956en
dc.rights© 2016 Mahmoud et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.en
dc.titleZinc Intake and Risk of Prostate Cancer: Case-Control Study and Meta-Analysisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, Dept Surgen
dc.identifier.journalPLOS ONEen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-24T17:04:48Z
html.description.abstractZinc is an essential dietary element that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer, a cancer that disproportionately affects men of African descent. Studies assessing the association of zinc intake and prostate cancer have yielded inconsistent results. Furthermore, very little is known about the relationship between zinc intake and prostate cancer among African Americans. We examined the association between self-reported zinc intake and prostate cancer in a hospital-based case-control study of African Americans. We then compared our results with previous studies by performing a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence regarding the association between zinc and prostate cancer. Newly diagnosed African American men with histologically confirmed prostate cancer (n = 127) and controls (n = 81) were recruited from an urban academic urology clinic in Washington, DC. Controls had higher zinc intake, with a mean of 14 mg/day versus 11 mg/day for cases. We observed a non-significant, non-linear increase in prostate cancer when comparing tertiles of zinc intake (OR (<6.5 vs 6.5-12.5mg/day) 1.8, 95% CI: 0.6,5.6; OR (<6.5 vs >12.5mg/day) 1.3, 95% CI: 0.2,6.5). The pooled estimate from 17 studies (including 3 cohorts, 2 nested case-control, 11 case-control studies, and 1 randomized clinical trial, with a total of 111,199 participants and 11,689 cases of prostate cancer) was 1.07 (hi vs lo) 95% CI: 0.98-1.16. Using a dose-response meta-analysis, we observed a non-linear trend in the relationship between zinc intake and prostate cancer (p for nonlinearity = 0.0022). This is the first study to examine the relationship between zinc intake in black men and risk of prostate cancer and systematically evaluate available epidemiologic evidence about the magnitude of the relationship between zinc intake and prostate cancer. Despite of the lower intake of zinc by prostate cancer patients, our meta-analysis indicated that there is no evidence for an association between zinc intake and prostate cancer.


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