Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPark, Arum
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-27T01:03:39Z
dc.date.available2017-01-27T01:03:39Z
dc.date.issued2013-05
dc.identifier.citationArum Park (2013). TRUTH AND GENRE IN PINDAR. The Classical Quarterly, 63, pp 17-36 doi: 10.1017/S000983881200078Xen
dc.identifier.issn0009-8388
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622193
dc.description.abstractBy convention epinician poetry claims to be both obligatory and truthful, yet in the intersection of obligation and truth lies a seeming paradox: the poet presents his poetry as commissioned by a patron but also claims to be unbiased enough to convey the truth. In Slater's interpretation Pindar reconciles this paradox by casting his relationship to the patron as one of guest-friendship: when he declares himself a guest-friend of the victor, he agrees to the obligation ‘a) not to be envious of his xenos and b) to speak well of him. The argumentation is: Xenia excludes envy, I am a xenos, therefore I am not envious and consequently praise honestly’. Slater observes that envy may foster bias against the patron, but the problem of pro-patron bias remains: does the poet's friendship with and obligation to his patron produce praise at the expense of truth?
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1017/S000983881200078Xen
dc.rights© The Classical Association 2013.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPindaren
dc.subjectTruthen
dc.subjectGenreen
dc.subjectGreek Poetryen
dc.subjectArchaic Poetryen
dc.subjectArchaic Lyricen
dc.subjectGreek Lyric Poetryen
dc.subjectGreek Literatureen
dc.titleTruth and Genre in Pindaren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1471-6844
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalThe Classical Quarterlyen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T17:13:59Z
html.description.abstractBy convention epinician poetry claims to be both obligatory and truthful, yet in the intersection of obligation and truth lies a seeming paradox: the poet presents his poetry as commissioned by a patron but also claims to be unbiased enough to convey the truth. In Slater's interpretation Pindar reconciles this paradox by casting his relationship to the patron as one of guest-friendship: when he declares himself a guest-friend of the victor, he agrees to the obligation ‘a) not to be envious of his xenos and b) to speak well of him. The argumentation is: Xenia excludes envy, I am a xenos, therefore I am not envious and consequently praise honestly’. Slater observes that envy may foster bias against the patron, but the problem of pro-patron bias remains: does the poet's friendship with and obligation to his patron produce praise at the expense of truth?


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
OFFPRINT CQ 63 1 2013.pdf
Size:
604.3Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Main Article

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record