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dc.contributor.authorUhrlaub, Jennifer L.
dc.contributor.authorPulko, Vesna
dc.contributor.authorDeFilippis, Victor R.
dc.contributor.authorBroeckel, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorStreblow, Daniel N.
dc.contributor.authorColeman, Gary D.
dc.contributor.authorPark, Byung S.
dc.contributor.authorLindo, John F.
dc.contributor.authorVickers, Ivan
dc.contributor.authorAnzinger, Joshua J.
dc.contributor.authorNikolich-Žugich, Janko
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-03T22:59:32Z
dc.date.available2017-02-03T22:59:32Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-13
dc.identifier.citationDysregulated TGF-β Production Underlies the Age-Related Vulnerability to Chikungunya Virus 2016, 12 (10):e1005891 PLOS Pathogensen
dc.identifier.issn1553-7374
dc.identifier.pmid27736984
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.ppat.1005891
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622415
dc.description.abstractChikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging global pathogen with pandemic potential, which causes fever, rash and debilitating arthralgia. Older adults over 65 years are particularly susceptible to severe and chronic CHIKV disease (CHIKVD), accounting for >90% of all CHIKV-related deaths. There are currently no approved vaccines or antiviral treatments available to limit chronic CHIKVD. Here we show that in old mice excessive, dysregulated TGF beta production during acute infection leads to a reduced immune response and subsequent chronic disease. Humans suffering from CHIKV infection also exhibited high TGF beta levels and a pronounced age-related defect in neutralizing anti-CHIKV antibody production. In vivo reduction of TGF beta levels minimized acute joint swelling, restored neutralizing antibody production and diminished chronic joint pathology in old mice. This study identifies increased and dysregulated TGF beta secretion as one key mechanism contributing to the age-related loss of protective anti-CHIKV-immunity leading to chronic CHIKVD.
dc.description.sponsorshipNIH [U54 AI081680]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCEen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1005891en
dc.rights© 2016 Uhrlaub et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.en
dc.titleDysregulated TGF-β Production Underlies the Age-Related Vulnerability to Chikungunya Virusen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, Dept Immunobiolen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, Arizona Ctr Agingen
dc.identifier.journalPLOS Pathogensen
dc.description.noteOpen Access Journal.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-24T15:42:00Z
html.description.abstractChikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging global pathogen with pandemic potential, which causes fever, rash and debilitating arthralgia. Older adults over 65 years are particularly susceptible to severe and chronic CHIKV disease (CHIKVD), accounting for >90% of all CHIKV-related deaths. There are currently no approved vaccines or antiviral treatments available to limit chronic CHIKVD. Here we show that in old mice excessive, dysregulated TGF beta production during acute infection leads to a reduced immune response and subsequent chronic disease. Humans suffering from CHIKV infection also exhibited high TGF beta levels and a pronounced age-related defect in neutralizing anti-CHIKV antibody production. In vivo reduction of TGF beta levels minimized acute joint swelling, restored neutralizing antibody production and diminished chronic joint pathology in old mice. This study identifies increased and dysregulated TGF beta secretion as one key mechanism contributing to the age-related loss of protective anti-CHIKV-immunity leading to chronic CHIKVD.


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