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dc.contributor.authorMulders, Gijs D.*
dc.contributor.authorPascucci, Ilaria*
dc.contributor.authorApai, Dániel*
dc.contributor.authorFrasca, Antonio*
dc.contributor.authorMolenda-Żakowicz, Joanna*
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-04T00:54:12Z
dc.date.available2017-02-04T00:54:12Z
dc.date.issued2016-11-23
dc.identifier.citationA SUPER-SOLAR METALLICITY FOR STARS WITH HOT ROCKY EXOPLANETS 2016, 152 (6):187 The Astronomical Journalen
dc.identifier.issn1538-3881
dc.identifier.doi10.3847/0004-6256/152/6/187
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622435
dc.description.abstractHost star metallicity provides a measure of the conditions in protoplanetary disks at the time of planet formation. Using a sample of over 20,000 Kepler stars with spectroscopic metallicities from the LAMOST survey, we explore how the exoplanet population depends on host star metallicity as a function of orbital period and planet size. We find that exoplanets with orbital periods less than 10 days are preferentially found around metal-rich stars ([Fe/H] similar or equal to 0.15 +/- 0.05 dex). The occurrence rates of these hot exoplanets increases to similar to 30% for super-solar metallicity stars from similar to 10% for stars with a sub-solar metallicity. Cooler exoplanets, which reside at longer orbital periods and constitute the bulk of the exoplanet population with an occurrence rate of greater than or similar to 90%, have host star metallicities consistent with solar. At short orbital periods, P < 10 days, the difference in host star metallicity is largest for hot rocky planets (< 1.7 R-circle plus), where the metallicity difference is [Fe/H] similar or equal to 0.25 +/- 0.07 dex. The excess of hot rocky planets around metal-rich stars implies they either share a formation mechanism with hot Jupiters, or trace a planet trap at the protoplanetary disk inner edge, which is metallicity dependent. We do not find statistically significant evidence for a previously identified trend that small planets toward the habitable zone are preferentially found around low-metallicity stars. Refuting or confirming this trend requires a larger sample of spectroscopic metallicities.
dc.description.sponsorshipNASA; National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NNX15AD94G]; [NCN 2014/13/B/ST9/00902]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://stacks.iop.org/1538-3881/152/i=6/a=187?key=crossref.620b7b649b0d56d82414dae4d01c7289en
dc.rights© 2016. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectplanetary systemsen
dc.subjectplanets and satellites: formationen
dc.subjectstars: abundancesen
dc.titleA SUPER-SOLAR METALLICITY FOR STARS WITH HOT ROCKY EXOPLANETSen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Lunar & Planetary Laben
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Astronen
dc.identifier.journalThe Astronomical Journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T09:15:11Z
html.description.abstractHost star metallicity provides a measure of the conditions in protoplanetary disks at the time of planet formation. Using a sample of over 20,000 Kepler stars with spectroscopic metallicities from the LAMOST survey, we explore how the exoplanet population depends on host star metallicity as a function of orbital period and planet size. We find that exoplanets with orbital periods less than 10 days are preferentially found around metal-rich stars ([Fe/H] similar or equal to 0.15 +/- 0.05 dex). The occurrence rates of these hot exoplanets increases to similar to 30% for super-solar metallicity stars from similar to 10% for stars with a sub-solar metallicity. Cooler exoplanets, which reside at longer orbital periods and constitute the bulk of the exoplanet population with an occurrence rate of greater than or similar to 90%, have host star metallicities consistent with solar. At short orbital periods, P < 10 days, the difference in host star metallicity is largest for hot rocky planets (< 1.7 R-circle plus), where the metallicity difference is [Fe/H] similar or equal to 0.25 +/- 0.07 dex. The excess of hot rocky planets around metal-rich stars implies they either share a formation mechanism with hot Jupiters, or trace a planet trap at the protoplanetary disk inner edge, which is metallicity dependent. We do not find statistically significant evidence for a previously identified trend that small planets toward the habitable zone are preferentially found around low-metallicity stars. Refuting or confirming this trend requires a larger sample of spectroscopic metallicities.


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