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dc.contributor.authorHeyerdahl, Emily K.
dc.contributor.authorMcKay, Steven J.
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-15T20:43:44Z
dc.date.available2017-02-15T20:43:44Z
dc.date.issued2008-06
dc.identifier.citationHeyerdahl, E.K., McKay, S.J., 2008. Condition of live fire-scarred ponderosa pine eleven years after removing partial cross-sections. Tree-Ring Research 64(1):61-64.en
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098
dc.identifier.issn2162-4585
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622566
dc.description.abstractOur objective is to report mortality rates for ponderosa pine trees in Oregon ten to eleven years after removing a fire-scarred partial cross-section from them, and five years after an initial survey of post-sampling mortality. We surveyed 138 live trees from which we removed fire-scarred partial crosssections in 1994/95 and 387 similarly sized, unsampled neighbor trees of the same species. These trees were from 78 plots distributed over about 5,000 ha at two sites in northeastern Oregon. The annual mortality rate for sectioned trees from 1994/95 to 2005 was 3.6% compared to 2.1% for the neighbor trees. However, many of the trees that died between 2000 and 2005 were likely killed by two prescribed fires at one of the sites. Excluding all trees in the plots burned by these fires (regardless of whether they died or not), the annual mortality rate for sectioned trees was 1.4% (identical to the rate from 1994/95 to 2000) compared to 1.0% for neighbor trees. During these fires, a greater proportion of sectioned trees died than did catfaced neighbor trees (80% versus 64%) but the difference was not significant.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectTree Ringsen
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen
dc.subjectPonderosa Pineen
dc.subjectFire Historyen
dc.subjectOregonen
dc.subjectEffect of Samplingen
dc.subjectPartial Cross-Sectionsen
dc.subjectFire Scaren
dc.subjectCatfaceen
dc.subjectWoundingen
dc.titleCondition Of Live Fire-Scarred Ponderosa Pine Eleven Years After Removing Partial Cross-Sectionsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUSDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratoryen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Minnesota, Department of Horticultural Scienceen
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T09:25:51Z
html.description.abstractOur objective is to report mortality rates for ponderosa pine trees in Oregon ten to eleven years after removing a fire-scarred partial cross-section from them, and five years after an initial survey of post-sampling mortality. We surveyed 138 live trees from which we removed fire-scarred partial crosssections in 1994/95 and 387 similarly sized, unsampled neighbor trees of the same species. These trees were from 78 plots distributed over about 5,000 ha at two sites in northeastern Oregon. The annual mortality rate for sectioned trees from 1994/95 to 2005 was 3.6% compared to 2.1% for the neighbor trees. However, many of the trees that died between 2000 and 2005 were likely killed by two prescribed fires at one of the sites. Excluding all trees in the plots burned by these fires (regardless of whether they died or not), the annual mortality rate for sectioned trees was 1.4% (identical to the rate from 1994/95 to 2000) compared to 1.0% for neighbor trees. During these fires, a greater proportion of sectioned trees died than did catfaced neighbor trees (80% versus 64%) but the difference was not significant.


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