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dc.contributor.authorNavarro, Sandi
dc.contributor.authorNeuhouser, Marian
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Ting-Yuan
dc.contributor.authorTinker, Lesley
dc.contributor.authorShikany, James
dc.contributor.authorSnetselaar, Linda
dc.contributor.authorMartinez, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorKato, Ikuko
dc.contributor.authorBeresford, Shirley
dc.contributor.authorChapkin, Robert
dc.contributor.authorLampe, Johanna
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-17T16:31:52Z
dc.date.available2017-02-17T16:31:52Z
dc.date.issued2016-11-30
dc.identifier.citationThe Interaction between Dietary Fiber and Fat and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the Women’s Health Initiative 2016, 8 (12):779 Nutrientsen
dc.identifier.issn2072-6643
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/nu8120779
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622593
dc.description.abstractCombined intakes of specific dietary fiber and fat subtypes protect against colon cancer in animal models. We evaluated associations between self-reported individual and combinations of fiber (insoluble, soluble, and pectins, specifically) and fat (omega-6, omega-3, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), specifically) and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk in the Women's Health Initiative prospective cohort (n = 134,017). During a mean 11.7 years (1993-2010), 1952 incident CRC cases were identified. Cox regression models computed multivariate adjusted hazard ratios to estimate the association between dietary factors and CRC risk. Assessing fiber and fat individually, there was a modest trend for lower CRC risk with increasing intakes of total and insoluble fiber (p-trend 0.09 and 0.08). An interaction (p = 0.01) was observed between soluble fiber and DHA + EPA, with protective effects of DHA + EPA with lower intakes of soluble fiber and an attenuation at higher intakes, however this association was no longer significant after correction for multiple testing. These results suggest a modest protective effect of higher fiber intake on CRC risk, but not in combination with dietary fat subtypes. Given the robust results in preclinical models and mixed results in observational studies, controlled dietary interventions with standardized intakes are needed to better understand the interaction of specific fat and fiber subtypes on colon biology and ultimately CRC susceptibility in humans.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services [HHSN268201100046C, HHSN268201100001C, HHSN268201100002C, HHSN268201100003C, HHSN268201100004C, HHSN271201100004C, P30 CA015704, R35 CA197707, T32 CA09168]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPI AGen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/8/12/779en
dc.rights© 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).en
dc.subjectbutyrateen
dc.subjectcolorectal canceren
dc.subjectDHAen
dc.subjectEPAen
dc.subjectfaten
dc.subjectfiberen
dc.subjectomega-3en
dc.subjectpectinen
dc.titleThe Interaction between Dietary Fiber and Fat and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the Women’s Health Initiativeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Ctr Canc, Dept Nutr Scien
dc.identifier.journalNutrientsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T03:47:54Z
html.description.abstractCombined intakes of specific dietary fiber and fat subtypes protect against colon cancer in animal models. We evaluated associations between self-reported individual and combinations of fiber (insoluble, soluble, and pectins, specifically) and fat (omega-6, omega-3, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), specifically) and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk in the Women's Health Initiative prospective cohort (n = 134,017). During a mean 11.7 years (1993-2010), 1952 incident CRC cases were identified. Cox regression models computed multivariate adjusted hazard ratios to estimate the association between dietary factors and CRC risk. Assessing fiber and fat individually, there was a modest trend for lower CRC risk with increasing intakes of total and insoluble fiber (p-trend 0.09 and 0.08). An interaction (p = 0.01) was observed between soluble fiber and DHA + EPA, with protective effects of DHA + EPA with lower intakes of soluble fiber and an attenuation at higher intakes, however this association was no longer significant after correction for multiple testing. These results suggest a modest protective effect of higher fiber intake on CRC risk, but not in combination with dietary fat subtypes. Given the robust results in preclinical models and mixed results in observational studies, controlled dietary interventions with standardized intakes are needed to better understand the interaction of specific fat and fiber subtypes on colon biology and ultimately CRC susceptibility in humans.


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