Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBhuta, Arvind A. R.
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Lisa M.
dc.contributor.authorPederson, Neil
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-17T18:13:07Z
dc.date.available2017-02-17T18:13:07Z
dc.date.issued2009-07
dc.identifier.citationBhuta, A.A.R., Kennedy, L.M., Pederson, N., 2009. Climate-radial growth relationships of northern latitudinal range margin longleaf pine (Pinus palustris P. Mill.) in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of southeastern Virginia. Tree-Ring Research 65(2):105-116.en
dc.identifier.issn2162-4585
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622605
dc.description.abstractClimate and longleaf pine (Pinus palustris P. Mill.) radial growth relationships have been documented within its southern and western distribution. However, knowledge of this relationship is lacking along its northern latitudinal range margin (NLRM). Based on the principles of ecological amplitude, limiting factors, and studies of coniferous species in eastern temperate forests of the U.S., we hypothesized that the radial growth of longleaf pine in mixed pine-hardwood forests is responding to winter temperatures in southeastern Virginia. Two longleaf pine chronologies were developed to determine the relationship between radial growth and monthly temperature, precipitation, and Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) via response function analysis (RFA). Results at the 0.05 level yielded significant response function coefficients with a positive response to current winter temperature and precipitation and a negative response to prior August PDSI. In studies of climate and longleaf pine radial growth in other parts of its range, winter temperature and precipitation have not shared a significant positive association with radial growth. Instead current spring and summer precipitation usually share this positive association. These findings add more evidence to an emerging pattern suggesting that winter temperatures contribute to limiting the radial growth of temperate conifers at northern range margins in the Northern Hemisphere.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen
dc.subjectTree Ringsen
dc.subjectDendroclimatologyen
dc.subjectPinus palustrisen
dc.subjectRestorationen
dc.subjectNorthern Latitudinal Range Marginen
dc.subjectResponse Function Analysisen
dc.titleClimate-Radial Growth Relationships Of Northern Latitudinal Range Margin Longleaf Pine (Pinus Palustris P. Mill.) In The Atlantic Coastal Plain Of Southeastern Virginiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.typetexten
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Geography, Virginia Techen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biological Sciences, Eastern Kentucky Universityen
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T17:40:54Z
html.description.abstractClimate and longleaf pine (Pinus palustris P. Mill.) radial growth relationships have been documented within its southern and western distribution. However, knowledge of this relationship is lacking along its northern latitudinal range margin (NLRM). Based on the principles of ecological amplitude, limiting factors, and studies of coniferous species in eastern temperate forests of the U.S., we hypothesized that the radial growth of longleaf pine in mixed pine-hardwood forests is responding to winter temperatures in southeastern Virginia. Two longleaf pine chronologies were developed to determine the relationship between radial growth and monthly temperature, precipitation, and Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) via response function analysis (RFA). Results at the 0.05 level yielded significant response function coefficients with a positive response to current winter temperature and precipitation and a negative response to prior August PDSI. In studies of climate and longleaf pine radial growth in other parts of its range, winter temperature and precipitation have not shared a significant positive association with radial growth. Instead current spring and summer precipitation usually share this positive association. These findings add more evidence to an emerging pattern suggesting that winter temperatures contribute to limiting the radial growth of temperate conifers at northern range margins in the Northern Hemisphere.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Bhuta etal-TRR65-2.pdf
Size:
793.7Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record