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dc.contributor.authorEdmondson, Jesse R.
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-17T20:10:11Z
dc.date.available2017-02-17T20:10:11Z
dc.date.issued2010-01
dc.identifier.citationEdmondson, J.R., 2010. The meteorological significance of false rings in eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana L.) from the Southern Great Plains. Tree-Ring Research 66(1):19-33.en
dc.identifier.issn2162-4585
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622614
dc.description.abstractThe growth rings of eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana L.) often contain a high frequency of false intra-annual growth bands, which complicates the dendrochronology of this species. However, exactly dated false rings replicated among many trees can reflect major weather changes during the growing season. Sixty-one trees from two sites (Oklahoma and Kansas) were dated and used to compile replicated chronologies of false rings at both locations extending from AD 1700–2000. False-ring events during the modern instrumental era were compared with the daily weather data from nearby stations. Significant false-ring events occurred at both locations during years that experienced a dramatic late-growing season weather reversal, when an extended period of high temperatures and drought was followed by prolonged cool and wet conditions. Synoptic weather maps for these events indicate that all ten replicated false-ring events in the instrumental era occurred during the highly unseasonable penetration of a cold front into the region. However, none of the significant false-ring events occurred in the same year at both sites. These separate false-ring chronologies indicate that there may be phenological differences in the timing of radial growth in redcedar between Kansas and Oklahoma, and that the weather conditions responsible for false-ring formation often occur at the mesoscale and do not often impact central Kansas and northcentral Oklahoma simultaneously.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen
dc.subjectTree Ringsen
dc.subjectJuniperus virginianaen
dc.subjectFalse Ringsen
dc.subjectWood Anatomyen
dc.subjectPhenologyen
dc.subjectSouthern Great Plainsen
dc.subjectDroughten
dc.subjectHeat Waveen
dc.subjectCool-Wet Spellen
dc.titleThe Meteorological Significance Of False Rings In Eastern Redcedar (Juniperus Virginiana L.) From The Southern Great Plains, U.S.A.en_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.typetexten
dc.contributor.departmentTree-Ring Laboratory, University of Arkansas, Department of Geosciencesen
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T17:41:33Z
html.description.abstractThe growth rings of eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana L.) often contain a high frequency of false intra-annual growth bands, which complicates the dendrochronology of this species. However, exactly dated false rings replicated among many trees can reflect major weather changes during the growing season. Sixty-one trees from two sites (Oklahoma and Kansas) were dated and used to compile replicated chronologies of false rings at both locations extending from AD 1700–2000. False-ring events during the modern instrumental era were compared with the daily weather data from nearby stations. Significant false-ring events occurred at both locations during years that experienced a dramatic late-growing season weather reversal, when an extended period of high temperatures and drought was followed by prolonged cool and wet conditions. Synoptic weather maps for these events indicate that all ten replicated false-ring events in the instrumental era occurred during the highly unseasonable penetration of a cold front into the region. However, none of the significant false-ring events occurred in the same year at both sites. These separate false-ring chronologies indicate that there may be phenological differences in the timing of radial growth in redcedar between Kansas and Oklahoma, and that the weather conditions responsible for false-ring formation often occur at the mesoscale and do not often impact central Kansas and northcentral Oklahoma simultaneously.


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