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dc.contributor.authorCopenheaver, Carolyn A.
dc.contributor.authorGoldbeck, Kyrille
dc.contributor.authorCherubini, Paolo
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-17T22:44:57Z
dc.date.available2017-02-17T22:44:57Z
dc.date.issued2010-07
dc.identifier.citationCopenheaver, C., Goldbeck, K., Cherubini, P., 2010. Lack of gender bias in citation rates of publications by dendrochronologists: What is unique about this discipline? Tree-Ring Research 66(2):127-133.en
dc.identifier.issn2162-4585
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622619
dc.description.abstractMost academic disciplines have a gender bias that exists in the recognition of research publications: women’s publications are cited at lower rates than men’s publications. In this paper, we examined whether a similar gender bias existed for publications by dendrochronologists. Tree-ring research is a fairly small field where males outnumber females, and therefore the sample size was limited to 20 female dendrochronologists and 20 male dendrochronologists. It was determined that native language (English or non-native English speaker), current employment (government or academic), and gender of the first-author do not significantly influence a paper’s probability of being cited. However, years since dissertation completion was a good predictor of a paper’s citation rate. We suggest that the high productivity of female dendrochronologists and a pattern of co-authoring with male colleagues bring the work of females to the attention of their male colleagues and thus eliminate the gender bias in citation of women’s work common to other disciplines.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen
dc.subjectTree Ringsen
dc.subjectGender Biasen
dc.subjectCitationen
dc.subjectPublishingen
dc.subjectWomen in Scienceen
dc.titleLack Of Gender Bias In Citation Rates Of Publications By Dendrochronologists: What is Unique About This Discipline?en_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.typetexten
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, Virginia Techen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity Libraries, Virginia Techen
dc.contributor.departmentSwiss Federal Institute for Forestry, Snow, and Landscape Research (WSL)en
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-26T11:29:07Z
html.description.abstractMost academic disciplines have a gender bias that exists in the recognition of research publications: women’s publications are cited at lower rates than men’s publications. In this paper, we examined whether a similar gender bias existed for publications by dendrochronologists. Tree-ring research is a fairly small field where males outnumber females, and therefore the sample size was limited to 20 female dendrochronologists and 20 male dendrochronologists. It was determined that native language (English or non-native English speaker), current employment (government or academic), and gender of the first-author do not significantly influence a paper’s probability of being cited. However, years since dissertation completion was a good predictor of a paper’s citation rate. We suggest that the high productivity of female dendrochronologists and a pattern of co-authoring with male colleagues bring the work of females to the attention of their male colleagues and thus eliminate the gender bias in citation of women’s work common to other disciplines.


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