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dc.contributor.authorDarnell, Diana
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Scott F
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-23T19:29:07Z
dc.date.available2017-02-23T19:29:07Z
dc.date.issued2017-01
dc.identifier.citationNeuroembryology. 2017, 6 (1) Wiley Interdiscip Rev Dev Biolen
dc.identifier.issn1759-7692
dc.identifier.pmid27906497
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/wdev.215
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622649
dc.description.abstractHow is it that some cells become neurons? And how is it that neurons become organized in the spinal cord and brain to allow us to walk and talk, to see, recall events in our lives, feel pain, keep our balance, and think? The cells that are specified to form the brain and spinal cord are originally located on the outside surface of the embryo. They loop inward to form the neural tube in a process called neurulation. Structures that are nearby send signals to the posterior neural tube to form and pattern the spinal cord so that the dorsal side receives sensory input and the ventral side sends motor signals from neurons to muscles. In the brain, stem cells near the center of the neural tube migrate out to form a mantel zone, and a set of dividing cells from the mantle zone migrate further to produce a second set of neurons at the outer surface of the brain. These neurons will form the cerebral cortex, which contains six discrete layers. Each layer has different connections and different functions. WIREs Dev Biol 2017, 6:e215. doi: 10.1002/wdev.215 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.
dc.description.sponsorshipNIH/NICHD [1P41HD064559-01]; NSF [IOS 1457177]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.rights© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.en
dc.subjectCNSen
dc.subjectdevelopmenten
dc.subjectbrainen
dc.subjectnervous systemen
dc.subjectdevelopmenten
dc.subjectinductionen
dc.subjectneurulationen
dc.subjectspina bifidaen
dc.titleNeuroembryology.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona, USAen
dc.identifier.journalWiley interdisciplinary reviews. Developmental biologyen
dc.description.note12 month embargo; version of record online: 1 December 2016en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
refterms.dateFOA2017-12-02T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractHow is it that some cells become neurons? And how is it that neurons become organized in the spinal cord and brain to allow us to walk and talk, to see, recall events in our lives, feel pain, keep our balance, and think? The cells that are specified to form the brain and spinal cord are originally located on the outside surface of the embryo. They loop inward to form the neural tube in a process called neurulation. Structures that are nearby send signals to the posterior neural tube to form and pattern the spinal cord so that the dorsal side receives sensory input and the ventral side sends motor signals from neurons to muscles. In the brain, stem cells near the center of the neural tube migrate out to form a mantel zone, and a set of dividing cells from the mantle zone migrate further to produce a second set of neurons at the outer surface of the brain. These neurons will form the cerebral cortex, which contains six discrete layers. Each layer has different connections and different functions. WIREs Dev Biol 2017, 6:e215. doi: 10.1002/wdev.215 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.


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