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dc.contributor.authorBourassa, Kyle
dc.contributor.authorSbarra, David A.
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-23T21:37:40Z
dc.date.available2017-02-23T21:37:40Z
dc.date.issued2017-02
dc.identifier.citationBody mass and cognitive decline are indirectly associated via inflammation among aging adults 2017, 60:63 Brain, Behavior, and Immunityen
dc.identifier.issn08891591
dc.identifier.pmid27658542
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bbi.2016.09.023
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622651
dc.description.abstractInflammatory models of neurodegeneration suggest that higher circulating levels of inflammation can lead to cognitive decline. Despite established independent associations between greater body mass, increased inflammation, and cognitive decline, no prior research has explored whether markers of systemic inflammation might mediate the association between body mass and changes in cognitive functioning. To test such a model, we used two longitudinal subsamples (ns = 9066; 12,561) of aging adults from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) study, which included two cognitive measures components of memory and executive functioning, as well as measurements of body mass and systemic inflammation, assessed via C-reactive protein (CRP). Greater body mass was indirectly associated with declines in memory and executive functioning over 6 years via relatively higher levels of CRP. Our results suggest that systemic inflammation is one biologically plausible mechanism through which differences in body mass might influence changes in cognitive functioning among aging adults.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute of Aging in the United States; UK government departmentsen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCEen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0889159116304329en
dc.rights© 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectInflammationen
dc.subjectC-reactive proteinen
dc.subjectBody massen
dc.subjectCognitionen
dc.subjectExecutive functioningen
dc.subjectMemoryen
dc.titleBody mass and cognitive decline are indirectly associated via inflammation among aging adultsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychology, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalBrain, Behavior, and Immunityen
dc.description.note12 month embargo; Available online 19 September 2016.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
refterms.dateFOA2017-09-20T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractInflammatory models of neurodegeneration suggest that higher circulating levels of inflammation can lead to cognitive decline. Despite established independent associations between greater body mass, increased inflammation, and cognitive decline, no prior research has explored whether markers of systemic inflammation might mediate the association between body mass and changes in cognitive functioning. To test such a model, we used two longitudinal subsamples (ns = 9066; 12,561) of aging adults from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) study, which included two cognitive measures components of memory and executive functioning, as well as measurements of body mass and systemic inflammation, assessed via C-reactive protein (CRP). Greater body mass was indirectly associated with declines in memory and executive functioning over 6 years via relatively higher levels of CRP. Our results suggest that systemic inflammation is one biologically plausible mechanism through which differences in body mass might influence changes in cognitive functioning among aging adults.


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