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dc.contributor.authorFrankl, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorPiaggi, Paolo
dc.contributor.authorFoley, James E.
dc.contributor.authorKrakoff, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorVotruba, Susanne B.
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-24T18:24:47Z
dc.date.available2017-02-24T18:24:47Z
dc.date.issued2017-01
dc.identifier.citationIn Vitro lipolysis is associated with whole-body lipid oxidation and weight gain in humans 2017, 25 (1):207 Obesityen
dc.identifier.issn19307381
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/oby.21670
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622655
dc.description.abstractObjective: To assess the association of adipocyte size with cellular lipolysis and between cellular lipolysis and whole-body lipid oxidation. This study also assessed the association between adipocyte size and cellular lipolysis with weight and fat mass gain. Methods: Subjects had assessment of percent body fat (% fat) and adipose tissue biopsy for in vitro lipolysis (n = 325), and a subset of subjects had measurement of whole-body lipid oxidation (n = 112). A subset of subjects (n = 243) returned for repeated measurements of body weight and composition (mean follow-up 8.2 +/- 5.5 years). Results: In vitro lipolysis (r = 0.47, P < 0.0001) and adipocyte size (r = 0.49, P < 0.0001) were strongly associated with % fat. In vitro lipolysis (P = 0.04) but not adipocyte size (P = 0.44) was associated with whole-body fat oxidation. Adipocyte size was not associated with rate of percent weight gain (P = 0.20) but was negatively associated with rate of percent fat mass gain (P = 0.01). In vitro lipolysis was negatively associated with rate of percent weight gain (P = 0.02) and had a marginal negative association with rate of percent fat mass gain (P = 0.08). Conclusions: These results indicate inherent characteristics of adipocytes, including size and lipolytic activity, may be important determinants of whole-body lipid oxidation and subsequent weight gain.
dc.description.sponsorshipIntramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseasesen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWILEY-BLACKWELLen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/oby.21670en
dc.rights© 2016 The Obesity Societyen
dc.titleIn Vitro lipolysis is associated with whole-body lipid oxidation and weight gain in humansen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona College of Medicineen
dc.identifier.journalObesityen
dc.description.note12 month embargo; Version of record online: 21 November 2016en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
dc.contributor.institutionObesity and Diabetes Clinical Research Section; National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health; Phoenix Arizona USA
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Arizona College of Medicine; Tucson Arizona USA
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Arizona College of Medicine; Tucson Arizona USA
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Arizona College of Medicine; Tucson Arizona USA
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Arizona College of Medicine; Tucson Arizona USA
refterms.dateFOA2017-11-22T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractObjective: To assess the association of adipocyte size with cellular lipolysis and between cellular lipolysis and whole-body lipid oxidation. This study also assessed the association between adipocyte size and cellular lipolysis with weight and fat mass gain. Methods: Subjects had assessment of percent body fat (% fat) and adipose tissue biopsy for in vitro lipolysis (n = 325), and a subset of subjects had measurement of whole-body lipid oxidation (n = 112). A subset of subjects (n = 243) returned for repeated measurements of body weight and composition (mean follow-up 8.2 +/- 5.5 years). Results: In vitro lipolysis (r = 0.47, P < 0.0001) and adipocyte size (r = 0.49, P < 0.0001) were strongly associated with % fat. In vitro lipolysis (P = 0.04) but not adipocyte size (P = 0.44) was associated with whole-body fat oxidation. Adipocyte size was not associated with rate of percent weight gain (P = 0.20) but was negatively associated with rate of percent fat mass gain (P = 0.01). In vitro lipolysis was negatively associated with rate of percent weight gain (P = 0.02) and had a marginal negative association with rate of percent fat mass gain (P = 0.08). Conclusions: These results indicate inherent characteristics of adipocytes, including size and lipolytic activity, may be important determinants of whole-body lipid oxidation and subsequent weight gain.


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