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dc.contributor.authorStefansson, Gudmundur
dc.contributor.authorHearty, Frederick
dc.contributor.authorRobertson, Paul
dc.contributor.authorMahadevan, Suvrath
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Tyler
dc.contributor.authorLevi, Eric
dc.contributor.authorBender, Chad
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorMonson, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorBlank, Basil
dc.contributor.authorHalverson, Samuel
dc.contributor.authorHenderson, Chuck
dc.contributor.authorRamsey, Lawrence
dc.contributor.authorRoy, Arpita
dc.contributor.authorSchwab, Christian
dc.contributor.authorTerrien, Ryan
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-01T23:24:52Z
dc.date.available2017-03-01T23:24:52Z
dc.date.issued2016-12-16
dc.identifier.citationA VERSATILE TECHNIQUE TO ENABLE SUB-MILLI-KELVIN INSTRUMENT STABILITY FOR PRECISE RADIAL VELOCITY MEASUREMENTS: TESTS WITH THE HABITABLE-ZONE PLANET FINDER 2016, 833 (2):175 The Astrophysical Journalen
dc.identifier.issn1538-4357
dc.identifier.doi10.3847/1538-4357/833/2/175
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622681
dc.description.abstractInsufficient instrument thermomechanical stability is one of the many roadblocks for achieving 10 cm s(-1) Doppler radial velocity precision, the precision needed to detect Earth-twins orbiting solar-type stars. Highly temperature and pressure stabilized spectrographs allow us to better calibrate out instrumental drifts, thereby helping in distinguishing instrumental noise from astrophysical stellar signals. We present the design and performance of the Environmental Control System (ECS) for the Habitable-zone Planet Finder (HPF), a high-resolution (R = 50,000) fiber-fed near-infrared (NIR) spectrograph for the 10 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory. HPF will operate at 180 K, driven by the choice of an H2RG NIR detector array with a 1.7 mu m cutoff. This ECS has demonstrated 0.6 mK rms stability over 15 days at both 180 and 300 K, and maintained high-quality vacuum (< 10 (7) Torr) over months, during long-term stability tests conducted without a planned passive thermal enclosure surrounding the vacuum chamber. This control scheme is versatile and can be applied as a blueprint to stabilize future NIR and optical high-precision Doppler instruments over a wide temperature range from similar to 77 K to elevated room temperatures. A similar ECS is being implemented to stabilize NEID, the NASA/NSF NN-EXPLORE spectrograph for the 3.5 m WIYN telescope at Kitt Peak, operating at 300 K. A [full SolidWorks 3D-CAD model] and a comprehensive parts list of the HPF ECS are included with this manuscript to facilitate the adaptation of this versatile environmental control scheme in the broader astronomical community.
dc.description.sponsorshipCenter for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds; Pennsylvania State University; Eberly College of Science; Pennsylvania Space Grant Consortium; Leifur Eiriksson Foundation Scholarship; NASA Headquarters under the NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program [NNX16AO28H]; NASA through the Sagan Fellowship Program; NSF [AST1006676, AST 1126413, AST 1310885]; NASA Astrobiology Institute [NNA09DA76A]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://stacks.iop.org/0004-637X/833/i=2/a=175?key=crossref.3aabf51a6904b3fa6ebaf482bdc9ae4fen
dc.rights© 2016. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectinstrumentation: spectrographsen
dc.subjecttechniques: radial velocitiesen
dc.subjecttechniques: spectroscopicen
dc.titleA VERSATILE TECHNIQUE TO ENABLE SUB-MILLI-KELVIN INSTRUMENT STABILITY FOR PRECISE RADIAL VELOCITY MEASUREMENTS: TESTS WITH THE HABITABLE-ZONE PLANET FINDERen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Steward Observen
dc.identifier.journalThe Astrophysical Journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T17:46:53Z
html.description.abstractInsufficient instrument thermomechanical stability is one of the many roadblocks for achieving 10 cm s(-1) Doppler radial velocity precision, the precision needed to detect Earth-twins orbiting solar-type stars. Highly temperature and pressure stabilized spectrographs allow us to better calibrate out instrumental drifts, thereby helping in distinguishing instrumental noise from astrophysical stellar signals. We present the design and performance of the Environmental Control System (ECS) for the Habitable-zone Planet Finder (HPF), a high-resolution (R = 50,000) fiber-fed near-infrared (NIR) spectrograph for the 10 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory. HPF will operate at 180 K, driven by the choice of an H2RG NIR detector array with a 1.7 mu m cutoff. This ECS has demonstrated 0.6 mK rms stability over 15 days at both 180 and 300 K, and maintained high-quality vacuum (< 10 (7) Torr) over months, during long-term stability tests conducted without a planned passive thermal enclosure surrounding the vacuum chamber. This control scheme is versatile and can be applied as a blueprint to stabilize future NIR and optical high-precision Doppler instruments over a wide temperature range from similar to 77 K to elevated room temperatures. A similar ECS is being implemented to stabilize NEID, the NASA/NSF NN-EXPLORE spectrograph for the 3.5 m WIYN telescope at Kitt Peak, operating at 300 K. A [full SolidWorks 3D-CAD model] and a comprehensive parts list of the HPF ECS are included with this manuscript to facilitate the adaptation of this versatile environmental control scheme in the broader astronomical community.


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