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dc.contributor.authorLaCross, Amyen
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Peter J.en
dc.contributor.authorBailey, E. Fionaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-03T00:19:46Z
dc.date.available2017-03-03T00:19:46Z
dc.date.issued2017-01-25
dc.identifier.citationAssociation between Laryngeal Airway Aperture and the Discharge Rates of Genioglossus Motor Units 2017, 8 Frontiers in Physiologyen
dc.identifier.issn1664-042X
dc.identifier.pmid28179887
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fphys.2017.00027
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622742
dc.description.abstractWe know very little about how muscles and motor units in one region of the upper airway are impacted by adjustments in an adjacent airway region. In this case, the focus is on regulation of the expiratory airstream by the larynx and how changes in laryngeal aperture impact muscle motor unit activities downstream in the pharynx. We selected sound production as a framework for study as it requires (i) sustained expiratory airflow, (ii) laryngeal airway regulation for production of whisper and voice, and (iii) pharyngeal airway regulation for production of different vowel sounds. We used these features as the means of manipulating expiratory airflow, pharyngeal, and laryngeal airway opening to compare the effect of each on the activation of genioglossus (GG) muscle motor units in the pharynx. We show that some GG muscle motor units (a) discharge stably on expiration associated with production of vowel sounds, (b) are exquisitely sensitive to subtle alterations in laryngeal airflow, and (c) discharge at higher firing rates in high flow vs. low flow conditions even when producing the same vowel sound. Our results reveal subtle changes in GG motor unit discharge rates that correlate with changes imposed at the larynx, and which may contribute to the regulation of the expiratory airstream.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute of Health [NIDCD 009587]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFRONTIERS MEDIA SAen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fphys.2017.00027/fullen
dc.rights© 2017 LaCross, Watson and Bailey. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).en
dc.subjectgenioglossusen
dc.subjectmotor uniten
dc.subjectphonationen
dc.titleAssociation between Laryngeal Airway Aperture and the Discharge Rates of Genioglossus Motor Unitsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, Dept Physiolen
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Physiologyen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-14T11:24:02Z
html.description.abstractWe know very little about how muscles and motor units in one region of the upper airway are impacted by adjustments in an adjacent airway region. In this case, the focus is on regulation of the expiratory airstream by the larynx and how changes in laryngeal aperture impact muscle motor unit activities downstream in the pharynx. We selected sound production as a framework for study as it requires (i) sustained expiratory airflow, (ii) laryngeal airway regulation for production of whisper and voice, and (iii) pharyngeal airway regulation for production of different vowel sounds. We used these features as the means of manipulating expiratory airflow, pharyngeal, and laryngeal airway opening to compare the effect of each on the activation of genioglossus (GG) muscle motor units in the pharynx. We show that some GG muscle motor units (a) discharge stably on expiration associated with production of vowel sounds, (b) are exquisitely sensitive to subtle alterations in laryngeal airflow, and (c) discharge at higher firing rates in high flow vs. low flow conditions even when producing the same vowel sound. Our results reveal subtle changes in GG motor unit discharge rates that correlate with changes imposed at the larynx, and which may contribute to the regulation of the expiratory airstream.


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