Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLew, Ben W. P.
dc.contributor.authorApai, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Yifan
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Glenn
dc.contributor.authorBurgasser, Adam J.
dc.contributor.authorKaralidi, Theodora
dc.contributor.authorYang, Hao
dc.contributor.authorMarley, Mark S.
dc.contributor.authorCowan, Nicolas B.
dc.contributor.authorBedin, Luigi R.
dc.contributor.authorMetchev, Stanimir A.
dc.contributor.authorRadigan, Jacqueline
dc.contributor.authorLowrance, Patrick J.
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-03T19:13:56Z
dc.date.available2017-03-03T19:13:56Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-29
dc.identifier.citationCLOUD ATLAS: DISCOVERY OF PATCHY CLOUDS AND HIGH-AMPLITUDE ROTATIONAL MODULATIONS IN A YOUNG, EXTREMELY RED L-TYPE BROWN DWARF 2016, 829 (2):L32 The Astrophysical Journalen
dc.identifier.issn2041-8213
dc.identifier.doi10.3847/2041-8205/829/2/L32
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622769
dc.description.abstractCondensate clouds fundamentally impact the atmospheric structure and spectra of exoplanets and brown dwarfs, but the connections between surface gravity, cloud structure, dust in the upper atmosphere, and the red colors of some brown dwarfs remain poorly understood. Rotational modulations enable the study of different clouds in the same atmosphere, thereby providing a method to isolate the effects of clouds. Here, we present the discovery of high peak-to-peak amplitude (8%) rotational modulations in a low-gravity, extremely red (J-K-s = 2.55) L6 dwarf WISEP J004701.06+680352.1 (W0047). Using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) time-resolved grism spectroscopy, we find a best-fit rotational period (13.20 +/- 0.14 hr) with a larger amplitude at 1.1 mu m than at 1.7 mu m. This is the third-largest near-infrared variability amplitude measured in a brown dwarf, demonstrating that large-amplitude variations are not limited to the L/T transition but are present in some extremely red L-type dwarfs. We report a tentative trend between the wavelength dependence of relative amplitude, possibly proxy for small dust grains lofted in the upper atmosphere, and the likelihood of large-amplitude variability. By assuming forsterite as a haze particle, we successfully explain the wavelength-dependent amplitude with submicron-sized haze particle sizes of around 0.4 mu m. W0047 links the earlier spectral and later spectral type brown dwarfs in which rotational modulations have been observed; the large amplitude variations in this object make this a benchmark brown dwarf for the study of cloud properties close to the L/T transition.
dc.description.sponsorshipTechnology Research Initiative Fund (TRIF) Imaging Fellowship, University of Arizona; NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute [14241]; NASA [NAS5-26555]; Space Telescope Science Institute [14241]; National Aeronautics and Space Administration; National Science Foundationen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://stacks.iop.org/2041-8205/829/i=2/a=L32?key=crossref.9855bfdeca51dc5bcc43c81ab8dceed1en
dc.rights© 2016. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectbrown dwarfsen
dc.subjectstars: atmospheresen
dc.subjectstars: individual (WISEP J004701.06+680352.1)en
dc.subjectstars: low-massen
dc.titleCLOUD ATLAS: DISCOVERY OF PATCHY CLOUDS AND HIGH-AMPLITUDE ROTATIONAL MODULATIONS IN A YOUNG, EXTREMELY RED L-TYPE BROWN DWARFen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Planetary Sci, Lunar & Planetary Laben
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Astron, Steward Observen
dc.identifier.journalThe Astrophysical Journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-26T13:10:59Z
html.description.abstractCondensate clouds fundamentally impact the atmospheric structure and spectra of exoplanets and brown dwarfs, but the connections between surface gravity, cloud structure, dust in the upper atmosphere, and the red colors of some brown dwarfs remain poorly understood. Rotational modulations enable the study of different clouds in the same atmosphere, thereby providing a method to isolate the effects of clouds. Here, we present the discovery of high peak-to-peak amplitude (8%) rotational modulations in a low-gravity, extremely red (J-K-s = 2.55) L6 dwarf WISEP J004701.06+680352.1 (W0047). Using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) time-resolved grism spectroscopy, we find a best-fit rotational period (13.20 +/- 0.14 hr) with a larger amplitude at 1.1 mu m than at 1.7 mu m. This is the third-largest near-infrared variability amplitude measured in a brown dwarf, demonstrating that large-amplitude variations are not limited to the L/T transition but are present in some extremely red L-type dwarfs. We report a tentative trend between the wavelength dependence of relative amplitude, possibly proxy for small dust grains lofted in the upper atmosphere, and the likelihood of large-amplitude variability. By assuming forsterite as a haze particle, we successfully explain the wavelength-dependent amplitude with submicron-sized haze particle sizes of around 0.4 mu m. W0047 links the earlier spectral and later spectral type brown dwarfs in which rotational modulations have been observed; the large amplitude variations in this object make this a benchmark brown dwarf for the study of cloud properties close to the L/T transition.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Lew_2016_ApJL_829_L32.pdf
Size:
848.8Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final Published Version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record