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dc.contributor.authorVarady, Robert G*
dc.contributor.authorZuniga-Teran, Adriana A*
dc.contributor.authorGarfin, Gregg M*
dc.contributor.authorMartín, Facundo*
dc.contributor.authorVicuña, Sebastián*
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-07T20:33:11Z
dc.date.available2017-03-07T20:33:11Z
dc.date.issued2016-08
dc.identifier.citationAdaptive management and water security in a global context: definitions, concepts, and examples 2016, 21:70 Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainabilityen
dc.identifier.issn18773435
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cosust.2016.11.001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622777
dc.description.abstractConventional water governance that centralizes decision making and focuses on increasing supply has sometimes led to ecological degradation and inequitable outcomes. As a corrective, Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) incorporates sustainability principles that integrate social, ecological, and infrastructural systems. However, this governance mode still does not address complex issues for an uncertain future, and fails to offer a clear goal. Adaptive management, another approach, relies on public participation and active knowledge exchange between scientists and policy-makers; it also incorporates uncertainty into decision-making. The concept of water security emerged subsequently to address the lack of a clear goal for water management. In this paper, we set into context the terms 'adaptive management' and 'water security' and review their evolution and their critiques. Both concepts require measurement and monitoring of outcomes in order to determine progress toward established goals so as to guide decision-making. We discuss the challenges and different ways of measuring water security and offer a representative list of potential indicators. The essay provides some examples of adaptive-management studies across the world and discusses adaptive management as it relates to the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Our concluding remarks reflect on present challenges, practical limitations, and promising ideas for a future type of water governance that is participatory, equitable, and adaptive.
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Water Security Network - Lloyd's Register Foundation (LRF), a charitable foundation in the U.K.; Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research (IAI) - U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) [GEO-1138881, SGP-CRA005]; U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) [NA11OAR4310143]; NSF [CRN3056, GEO-1128040]; Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation in Tucson, Arizonaen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherELSEVIER SCI LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1877343516300719en
dc.rights© 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en
dc.titleAdaptive management and water security in a global context: definitions, concepts, and examplesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUdall Center for Studies in Public Policy, University of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalCurrent Opinion in Environmental Sustainabilityen
dc.description.note24 month embargo; Available online 1 December 2016en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
html.description.abstractConventional water governance that centralizes decision making and focuses on increasing supply has sometimes led to ecological degradation and inequitable outcomes. As a corrective, Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) incorporates sustainability principles that integrate social, ecological, and infrastructural systems. However, this governance mode still does not address complex issues for an uncertain future, and fails to offer a clear goal. Adaptive management, another approach, relies on public participation and active knowledge exchange between scientists and policy-makers; it also incorporates uncertainty into decision-making. The concept of water security emerged subsequently to address the lack of a clear goal for water management. In this paper, we set into context the terms 'adaptive management' and 'water security' and review their evolution and their critiques. Both concepts require measurement and monitoring of outcomes in order to determine progress toward established goals so as to guide decision-making. We discuss the challenges and different ways of measuring water security and offer a representative list of potential indicators. The essay provides some examples of adaptive-management studies across the world and discusses adaptive management as it relates to the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Our concluding remarks reflect on present challenges, practical limitations, and promising ideas for a future type of water governance that is participatory, equitable, and adaptive.


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