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dc.contributor.authorde Grenade, R*
dc.contributor.authorHouse-Peters, L*
dc.contributor.authorScott, CA*
dc.contributor.authorThapa, B*
dc.contributor.authorMills-Novoa, M*
dc.contributor.authorGerlak, A*
dc.contributor.authorVerbist, K*
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-07T23:58:40Z
dc.date.available2017-03-07T23:58:40Z
dc.date.issued2016-08
dc.identifier.citationThe nexus: reconsidering environmental security and adaptive capacity 2016, 21:15 Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainabilityen
dc.identifier.issn18773435
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cosust.2016.10.009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622778
dc.description.abstractThe water energy food nexus has emerged as a productive discourse and methodology in academic research, science policy dialogues, and development agendas. While the nexus provides a robust framework for interdisciplinary study, research remains focused on synergies and tradeoffs in resource 'security' and fails to adequately acknowledge the environment as the set of natural processes underpinning the nexus, particularly interactions among water, energy, and food. Resource security as a reductionist discourse does not address the limitations and potential of natural processes and the dynamic nature of human processes, especially adaptation to global change. A review of recent literature highlights the need to redefine the nexus to fundamentally incorporate the environment, and, drawing on social ecological systems thinking, to integrate considerations of adaptive capacity and resilience within nexus theory and practice. Future directions for this line of inquiry include identifying feasible ways of assessing the nexus in the context of dynamic social and ecological systems, and implications that adaptive actions have across resource-use sectors and the environment. A more holistic nexus framework enhances our options to manage environmental interactions, human activities, and policies to adapt to global-change uncertainties.
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Water Security Network - Lloyd's Register Foundation (LRF); U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) [GEO-1138881, SGP-CRA005]; NSF [CRN3056, GEO-1128040, DEB-1010495]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherELSEVIER SCI LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1877343516300690en
dc.rights© 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en
dc.titleThe nexus: reconsidering environmental security and adaptive capacityen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona, Udall Center for Studies in Public Policyen
dc.identifier.journalCurrent Opinion in Environmental Sustainabilityen
dc.description.note24 month embargo; Available online 22nd November 2016en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
html.description.abstractThe water energy food nexus has emerged as a productive discourse and methodology in academic research, science policy dialogues, and development agendas. While the nexus provides a robust framework for interdisciplinary study, research remains focused on synergies and tradeoffs in resource 'security' and fails to adequately acknowledge the environment as the set of natural processes underpinning the nexus, particularly interactions among water, energy, and food. Resource security as a reductionist discourse does not address the limitations and potential of natural processes and the dynamic nature of human processes, especially adaptation to global change. A review of recent literature highlights the need to redefine the nexus to fundamentally incorporate the environment, and, drawing on social ecological systems thinking, to integrate considerations of adaptive capacity and resilience within nexus theory and practice. Future directions for this line of inquiry include identifying feasible ways of assessing the nexus in the context of dynamic social and ecological systems, and implications that adaptive actions have across resource-use sectors and the environment. A more holistic nexus framework enhances our options to manage environmental interactions, human activities, and policies to adapt to global-change uncertainties.


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