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dc.contributor.authorBourassa, Kyle J.
dc.contributor.authorMemel, Molly
dc.contributor.authorWoolverton, Cindy
dc.contributor.authorSbarra, David A.
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-09T22:09:25Z
dc.date.available2017-03-09T22:09:25Z
dc.date.issued2015-09
dc.identifier.citationSocial participation predicts cognitive functioning in aging adults over time: comparisons with physical health, depression, and physical activity 2015, 21 (2):133 Aging & Mental Healthen
dc.identifier.issn1360-7863
dc.identifier.issn1364-6915
dc.identifier.pmid26327492
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13607863.2015.1081152
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622789
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Several risk and protective factors are associated with changes in cognitive functioning in aging adults - including physical health, depression, physical activity, and social activities - though the findings for participation in social activities are mixed. This study investigated the longitudinal association between social participation and two domains of cognitive functioning, memory and executive function. A primary goal of our analyses was to determine whether social participation predicted cognitive functioning over-and-above physical health, depression, and physical activity in a sample with adequate power to detect unique effects. Method: The sample included aging adults (N = 19,832) who participated in a large, multi-national study and provided data across six years; split into two random subsamples. Unique associations between the predictors of interest and cognitive functioning over time and within occasion were assessed in a latent curve growth model. Results: Social participation predicted both domains of cognitive functioning at each occasion, and the relative magnitude of this effect was comparable to physical health, depression, and physical activity level. In addition, social participation at the first time point predicted change in cognitive functioning over time. The substantive results in the initial sample were replicated in the second independent subsample. Conclusion: Overall, the magnitude of the association of social participation is comparable to other well-established predictors of cognitive functioning, providing evidence that social participation plays an important role in cognitive functioning and successful aging.
dc.description.sponsorshipEuropean Commission [QLK6-CT-2001-00360, RII-CT-2006-062193, CIT5-CT-2005-028857, CIT4-CT-2006-028812, 211909, 227822, 261982]; U.S. National Institute on Aging [U01 AG09740-13S2, P01 AG005842, P01 AG08291, P30 AG12815, R21 AG025169, Y1-AG-4553-01, IAG BSR06-11, OGHA 04-064]; German Ministry of Education and Researchen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13607863.2015.1081152en
dc.rightsCopyright © 2017 Routledge.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectcognitionen
dc.subjectsocial participationen
dc.subjectdepressionen
dc.subjectphysical healthen
dc.subjectphysical activityen
dc.titleSocial participation predicts cognitive functioning in aging adults over time: comparisons with physical health, depression, and physical activityen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychology, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalAging & Mental Healthen
dc.description.note12 month embargo; Published online: 01 Sep 2015en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
refterms.dateFOA2016-09-02T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractObjectives: Several risk and protective factors are associated with changes in cognitive functioning in aging adults - including physical health, depression, physical activity, and social activities - though the findings for participation in social activities are mixed. This study investigated the longitudinal association between social participation and two domains of cognitive functioning, memory and executive function. A primary goal of our analyses was to determine whether social participation predicted cognitive functioning over-and-above physical health, depression, and physical activity in a sample with adequate power to detect unique effects. Method: The sample included aging adults (N = 19,832) who participated in a large, multi-national study and provided data across six years; split into two random subsamples. Unique associations between the predictors of interest and cognitive functioning over time and within occasion were assessed in a latent curve growth model. Results: Social participation predicted both domains of cognitive functioning at each occasion, and the relative magnitude of this effect was comparable to physical health, depression, and physical activity level. In addition, social participation at the first time point predicted change in cognitive functioning over time. The substantive results in the initial sample were replicated in the second independent subsample. Conclusion: Overall, the magnitude of the association of social participation is comparable to other well-established predictors of cognitive functioning, providing evidence that social participation plays an important role in cognitive functioning and successful aging.


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