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dc.contributor.advisorTrouard, Theodoreen
dc.contributor.advisorBilgin, Alien
dc.contributor.authorUmapathy, Lavanya
dc.creatorUmapathy, Lavanyaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-22T23:35:45Z
dc.date.available2017-03-22T23:35:45Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622837
dc.description.abstractDiffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) has been used to non-invasively investigate the integrity of white matter and the connectivity of the brain. In this work, high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), an advanced dMRI methodology was developed and employed in bonnet macaque monkeys to study the connectivity of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and amygdala, two gray matter regions involved in making reward-guided decisions. With age, it is believed that there is a decline in the white matter connectivity between these two regions, also known as uncinate fasciculus (UF), and that this affects reward-value assignment and feedback learning in older adults. The analysis pipeline involved correction for distortions due to eddy currents and field inhomogeneity, noise reduction using a local principal component analysis based technique and subsequent registration to the high-resolution T1-weighted images. Gray matter regions corresponding to OFC and amygdala were identified on the T1-weighted images and probabilistic tractography was carried out to delineate the tracts belonging to UF. The output connectivity map from tractography was used to extract imaging parameters of interest such as fractional anisotropy, axial and radial diffusivity along the UF. A significant reduction in the fractional anisotropy index and the axial diffusivity index along the UF tract was observed with increased age of monkeys. Compared to the left hemisphere, stronger trends were observed in the right hemisphere of the monkeys, indicating possible laterality.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectDiffusion Tensor Imagingen
dc.subjectDiffusion-weighted imagingen
dc.subjectMagnetic Resonance Imagingen
dc.subjectTract integrity assessmenten
dc.subjectUncinate fasciculusen
dc.subjectAgingen
dc.titleAssessment of White Matter Integrity in Bonnet Macaque Monkeys using Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imagingen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
dc.contributor.committeememberTrouard, Theodoreen
dc.contributor.committeememberBilgin, Alien
dc.contributor.committeememberTharp, Halen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical & Computer Engineeringen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-23T12:22:59Z
html.description.abstractDiffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) has been used to non-invasively investigate the integrity of white matter and the connectivity of the brain. In this work, high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), an advanced dMRI methodology was developed and employed in bonnet macaque monkeys to study the connectivity of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and amygdala, two gray matter regions involved in making reward-guided decisions. With age, it is believed that there is a decline in the white matter connectivity between these two regions, also known as uncinate fasciculus (UF), and that this affects reward-value assignment and feedback learning in older adults. The analysis pipeline involved correction for distortions due to eddy currents and field inhomogeneity, noise reduction using a local principal component analysis based technique and subsequent registration to the high-resolution T1-weighted images. Gray matter regions corresponding to OFC and amygdala were identified on the T1-weighted images and probabilistic tractography was carried out to delineate the tracts belonging to UF. The output connectivity map from tractography was used to extract imaging parameters of interest such as fractional anisotropy, axial and radial diffusivity along the UF. A significant reduction in the fractional anisotropy index and the axial diffusivity index along the UF tract was observed with increased age of monkeys. Compared to the left hemisphere, stronger trends were observed in the right hemisphere of the monkeys, indicating possible laterality.


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