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dc.contributor.advisorPeek, Gloannaen
dc.contributor.authorMartinez, Mariel
dc.creatorMartinez, Marielen
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-28T22:24:06Z
dc.date.available2017-03-28T22:24:06Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622904
dc.description.abstractBackground: The rate of childhood cancer survivors has grown to nearly 80% in the past few decades. Current evidence reveals that primary care providers report feeling unprepared with inadequate knowledge about the variable types of late effects and diagnostic screenings recommended for childhood cancer survivors (Dulko et al., 2013; Potosky et al., 2011). However, the current evidence reflects data mainly from physicians. None of the current literature addresses the specific preparedness of primary care nurse practitioners. Such data would be helpful in better understanding how education and current resources affect nurse practitioner preparedness for such a narrow, but growingly prevalent, patient population.Purpose: To assess primary care nurse practitioner preparedness when caring for childhood cancer survivors.Methods: This descriptive study obtained data using a survey disseminated to primary care nurse practitioner members of the Puget Sound Nurse Practitioner Association in Seattle, WA. Analysis was conducted by calculating the means and modes for each survey item. Results: This sample (n=5) revealed that 50% of nurse practitioners identify as feeling adequately trained to care for childhood cancer survivors. Time and insurance coverage were not found to be barriers to care. Less than 50% of nurse practitioners utilized guidelines from the Children’s Oncology Group. The most wanted resources included the Children’s Oncology Group guidelines, survivor care plans, and electronic health record prompts. Discussion: According to the results of this study imply that nurse practitioners in the Seattle area feel adequately prepared to care for childhood cancer survivors. In addition, nurse practitioners identify that clinical practice guidelines may be beneficial in guiding their care. However, certain limitations, including small sample size, may affect the trustworthiness of the results. Thus, more research is warranted to gather more comprehensive knowledge and understanding regarding nurse practitioner preparedness when caring for childhood cancer survivors in the primary care setting.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectNurse practitioneren
dc.subjectPediatricen
dc.subjectSurvivoren
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.titleAssessing Nurse Practitioner Preparedness When Caring for Childhood Cancer Survivorsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.levelNursingen
dc.contributor.committeememberPeek, Gloannaen
dc.contributor.committeememberMoore, Idaen
dc.contributor.committeememberWiley, Luzen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T18:03:46Z
html.description.abstractBackground: The rate of childhood cancer survivors has grown to nearly 80% in the past few decades. Current evidence reveals that primary care providers report feeling unprepared with inadequate knowledge about the variable types of late effects and diagnostic screenings recommended for childhood cancer survivors (Dulko et al., 2013; Potosky et al., 2011). However, the current evidence reflects data mainly from physicians. None of the current literature addresses the specific preparedness of primary care nurse practitioners. Such data would be helpful in better understanding how education and current resources affect nurse practitioner preparedness for such a narrow, but growingly prevalent, patient population.Purpose: To assess primary care nurse practitioner preparedness when caring for childhood cancer survivors.Methods: This descriptive study obtained data using a survey disseminated to primary care nurse practitioner members of the Puget Sound Nurse Practitioner Association in Seattle, WA. Analysis was conducted by calculating the means and modes for each survey item. Results: This sample (n=5) revealed that 50% of nurse practitioners identify as feeling adequately trained to care for childhood cancer survivors. Time and insurance coverage were not found to be barriers to care. Less than 50% of nurse practitioners utilized guidelines from the Children’s Oncology Group. The most wanted resources included the Children’s Oncology Group guidelines, survivor care plans, and electronic health record prompts. Discussion: According to the results of this study imply that nurse practitioners in the Seattle area feel adequately prepared to care for childhood cancer survivors. In addition, nurse practitioners identify that clinical practice guidelines may be beneficial in guiding their care. However, certain limitations, including small sample size, may affect the trustworthiness of the results. Thus, more research is warranted to gather more comprehensive knowledge and understanding regarding nurse practitioner preparedness when caring for childhood cancer survivors in the primary care setting.


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